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Germ Cell Tumor clinical trials at UCSF
6 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • Collecting and Storing Blood and Brain Tumor Tissue Samples From Children With Brain Tumors

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    The purpose of this study is to collect and store brain tissue samples and blood from children with brain cancer that will be tested in the laboratory. Collecting and storing samples of tumor tissue and blood from patients to test in the laboratory may help the study of cancer in the future.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    open to eligible males ages 14 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Alisertib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial is studying the side effects of and how well alisertib works in treating young patients with relapsed or refractory solid tumors or leukemia. Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Drugs used as chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, etoposide, and ifosfamide work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed central nervous system germ cell tumors.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Sodium Thiosulfate in Preventing Hearing Loss in Young Patients Receiving Cisplatin for Newly Diagnosed Germ Cell Tumor, Hepatoblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Neuroblastoma, Osteosarcoma, or Other Malignancy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Sodium thiosulfate may reduce or prevent hearing loss in young patients receiving cisplatin for cancer. It is not yet known whether sodium thiosulfate is more effective than no additional treatment in preventing hearing loss.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying sodium thiosulfate to see how well it works in preventing hearing loss in young patients receiving cisplatin for newly diagnosed germ cell tumor, hepatoblastoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, or other malignancy.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial is studying surgery followed by combination chemotherapy to see how well it works in treating children with germ cell tumors that are not located in the head. Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Combining more than one drug, and giving them after surgery, may kill any remaining tumor cells following surgery. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is effective in decreasing the recurrence of childhood germ cell tumors.

    Oakland, California and other locations