Skip to main content

Liver Disease clinical trials at UCSF
10 in progress, 4 open to new patients

  • Emricasan, a Caspase Inhibitor, for Evaluation in Subjects With Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Fibrosis

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involving subjects with a diagnosis of "definite NASH" with fibrosis (excluding cirrhosis) as determined by the central histopathologist. Upon successful screening, subjects will be randomized to receive either emricasan 50 mg BID or emricasan 5 mg BID or matching placebo BID.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • NAFLD Pediatric Database 2

    open to eligible people ages 2 years to 17 years

    The NAFLD Database 2 will recruit at least 650 new pediatric participants with liver biopsies and contemporaneous biosamples, and will also invite pediatric participants from the prior NAFLD Database and TONIC trial (50 with a recent biopsy and 150 without a contemporaneous biopsy) to enroll in the NAFLD Pediatric Database 2 study. Combining the new and continuing participants leads to a recruitment goal for the pediatric Database 2 of 850 pediatric participants during the enrollment period.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Adult Database 2

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The NAFLD Database 2 will recruit at least 1,500 new adult participants suspected or known to have NAFLD or NASH-related cirrhosis and will also invite adult participants from the prior NAFLD Database and related studies (PIVENS trial and TONIC trial) to enroll in the NAFLD Database 2. To elucidate, through the cooperative effort of a multidisciplinary and multicenter group of collaborators, the etiology, natural history, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of NAFLD, and in particular its more severe form of NASH and its complications.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Patient-Centered Care and Asian Americans

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Liver cancer and hepatitis B are major health disparities for Asian Americans, while hepatitis C is a rising problem. Little is known about how to improve the quality of health care Asian Americans receive in general and for viral hepatitis in particular. Technology, specifically mobile applications, potentially can provide a flexible and efficient way to address these challenges. This proposed project seeks to develop, implement, and test an intervention to increase hepatitis B and C screening for Asian Americans in 2 healthcare systems in the San Francisco Bay Area. The research team will develop, implement, and evaluate the efficacy of an interactive, patient- centered mobile application for use on a tablet computer to increase the rate of hepatitis B and C screening among unscreened Asian Americans age 18 and older. The team will use their experience from a successful track record in health promotion to develop the intervention by working with patients, community leaders and advocates, clinical staff, healthcare providers, and healthcare system administrators from a county safety net system and an academic primary care practice in the San Francisco Bay Area. The mobile application will include video clips with a physician (Video Doctor) addressing patient concerns regarding hepatitis B and C screening in the patient's preferred language, English, Chinese, or Vietnamese. A patient who has not been screened for hepatitis B will answer questions about his or her characteristics and preferences using the mobile application. The mobile application will then show 30-60 seconds video clips with messages that address the patient's responses related to hepatitis B screening and that are delivered by an actor playing a physician. Those who are born between 1945 and 1965 also receive messages about hepatitis C screening. At the end, the tablet computer will generate a provider alert to let the treating provider know what the patient's preferences are regarding testing for viral hepatitis. Once developed, the intervention will then be used in combination with a physician panel notification and tested against physician panel notification only in a randomized controlled trial to see which approach is better in increasing the rate of hepatitis B and C screening. The team will also work with the 2 healthcare system to ensure that the interventions will be practical and easily adopted once the study is over. The findings of this project will greatly expand understanding about how to use technology- based interventions to improve quality of healthcare in diverse patient populations.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Exercise Intervention in Liver Transplant Patients

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to learn more about the effects of exercise on functional status and outcomes on patients with end-stage liver disease on the liver transplant waiting list and who have undergone liver transplantation.

  • An Extension Study to Evaluate the Long-Term Safety and Durability of Effect of LUM001 in the Treatment of Cholestatic Liver Disease in Pediatric Subjects With Alagille Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a multicentre, extension study of LUM001 in children diagnosed with Alagille Syndrome who have completed participation in a core LUM001 treatment protocol. The primary objective is to evaluate long-term safety and tolerability of LUM001. Efficacy will be assessed by evaluating the effect of LUM001 on the biochemical markers and pruritus associated with Alagille Syndrome.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • De Novo Lipogenesis, Lipid and Carbohydrate Metabolism in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is paralleled with increased cases of non-alcoholic liver disease (liver fat accumulation) and diabetes. Fat belongs in the adipose tissue, and if excess fat accumulates in the liver or muscle, these tissues cannot use sugar efficiently. It has been discovered that when large quantities of fructose (a sugar present in soft drinks) are consumed, the conversion of carbohydrate (CHO) to fat in the liver increases. We hypothesize that: 1) subjects with fatty liver have a higher CHO uptake and conversion to fat in their liver when compared to matched control subjects with normal liver fat content; and that: 2) when subjects with fatty liver are fed a diet limiting fructose and simple sugars will decrease their liver CHO fat content. This reduction in liver fat will normalize the way the liver responds to sugar and insulin, reversing the pre-diabetic state. The measurement of these parameters will be done using state-of-the-art techniques such as safe non-radioactive isotope tracers and non-invasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy. For more information, please call 415-206-5532 for a phone screening

    Vallejo, California

  • Evaluating the Genetic Causes and Progression of Cholestatic Liver Diseases (LOGIC)

    Sorry, accepting new patients

    Cholestasis is a condition in which bile is not properly transported from the liver to the small intestine. Cholestasis can be caused by an array of childhood diseases, including the genetic diseases Alagille syndrome (ALGS), alpha-1 antitrypsin (a-1AT) deficiency, bile acid synthesis and metabolism defects, and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) or benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis(BRIC). This study will investigate the natural history and progression of the four previously mentioned cholestatic liver diseases to provide a better understanding of the causes and effects of the diseases.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • FibroScan™ in Pediatric Cholestatic Liver Disease Study Protocol

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Noninvasive monitoring of liver fibrosis is an unmet need within the clinical management of pediatric chronic liver disease. While liver biopsy is often used in the initial diagnostic evaluation, subsequent biopsies are rarely performed because of inherent invasiveness and risks. This study will evaluate the role of non-invasive FibroScan™ technology to detect and quantify liver fibrosis.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Longitudinal Study of Mitochondrial Hepatopathies

    Sorry, accepting new patients

    The specific aims of this study are (1) to determine the clinical phenotypes and natural history of hepatic RC and FAO disorders, (2) to determine the correlation between genotype and phenotype, (3) to determine if circulating biomarkers reflect diagnosis and predict liver disease progression and survival with the native liver, (4) to determine the clinical outcome of these disorders following liver transplantation, and (5) to develop a repository of serum, plasma, urine, tissue and DNA specimens that will be used in ancillary studies. To accomplish these aims, the ChiLDREN investigators at clinical sites (currently 15 sites) will prospectively collect defined data and specimens in a uniform fashion at fixed intervals in a relatively large number of subjects. Clinical information and DNA samples to be collected from subjects and their parents will enhance the potential for meaningful research in these disorders. A biobank of subject specimens and DNA samples will be established for use in ancillary studies to be performed in addition to this study.

    San Francisco, California and other locations