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Mantle Cell Lymphoma clinical trials at UCSF
3 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    open to eligible females ages up to 29 years

    This clinical trial studies blood sample markers of reproductive hormones in assessing ovarian reserve in younger patients with newly diagnosed lymphomas. Studying samples of blood from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help measure the effect of curative therapy for lymphoma on ovarian failure.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called "anti-HIV genes" are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Bortezomib After Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and an Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well bortezomib works when given after combination chemotherapy, rituximab, and an autologous stem cell transplant in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma. Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) together with an autologous stem cell transplant may allow more chemotherapy to be given so that more cancer cells are killed. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Giving bortezomib after combination chemotherapy, monoclonal antibody therapy, and an autologous stem cell transplant may kill any remaining cancer cells or keep the cancer from coming back.

    San Francisco, California and other locations