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Summary

for people ages 64 years and up (full criteria)
at San Francisco, California
study started
estimated completion:

Description

Summary

There is recent, but limited evidence to suggest that anesthetic depth is associated with poor postoperative cognitive outcomes. Specifically, several studies suggest that deeper level of anesthesia is associated with increased incidence of postoperative delirium and longer-term cognitive decline. In fact, some suggest that older patients undergoing surgery should routinely be monitored with an anesthetic depth monitor to allow the titration of anesthetics or sedation medications to lighter levels to promote better postoperative cognitive outcomes. However, such a practice has never been validated or proven to be feasible or safe. Accordingly, the investigators plan an exploratory study to determine the feasibility and safety of randomizing patients undergoing major surgery to receive deep vs. light anesthetic levels during surgery.

Official Title

THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT vs DEEP ANESTHESIA ON POSTOPERATIVE COGNITIVE OUTCOMES

Details

In this exploratory grant, the investigators aim to determine whether two different anesthetic depths as measured by an anesthetic depth monitor can be practiced uniformly by a number of anesthesia providers and with safety across a large group of older surgical patients. The investigators will use a randomized control trial design to randomize 232 patients in receiving "light" vs "deep" anesthesia as measured by an anesthetic depth monitor. Postoperative outcomes will include delirium and cognitive measurements.

Keywords

Delirium Cognitive Disorders Cognition Surgery Anesthesia Aging Anesthetics

Eligibility

You can join if…

Open to people ages 64 years and up

  • 65 years and older of age undergoing non-cardiac surgery

You CAN'T join if...

  • patients' who are not fluent in English or cannot provide informed consent

Location

Details

Status
accepting new patients
Start Date
Completion Date
(estimated)
Sponsor
University of California, San Francisco
ID
NCT01983384
Phase
Phase 3
Lead Scientist
Jacqueline Leung
Study Type
Interventional
Last Updated
September 15, 2016
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