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Transfusion Dependent Beta-thalassemia clinical trials at UCSF
1 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • A Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of ST-400 for Treatment of Transfusion-Dependent Beta-thalassemia (TDT)

    open to eligible people ages 18–40

    This is a single-arm, multi-site, single-dose, Phase 1/2 study to assess ST-400 in 6 subjects with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia (TDT) who are ≥18 and ≤40 years of age. ST-400 is a type of investigational therapy that consists of gene edited cells. ST-400 is composed of the patient's own blood stem cells which are genetically modified in the laboratory using Sangamo's zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology to disrupt a precise and specific sequence of the enhancer of the BCL11A gene (which normally suppresses fetal hemoglobin production in erythrocytes). This process is intended to boost fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which can substitute for reduced or absent adult (defective) hemoglobin, and is done without the use of integrating viral vectors. ST-400 is then infused back into the patient after receiving conditioning chemotherapy to make room for the new cells in the bone marrow, with the aim of producing new erythrocytes with increased amounts of HbF. The primary objective is to understand safety and tolerability of ST-400, and secondary objectives are to assess the effects on HbF levels and transfusion requirements.

    Oakland, California