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Transient Ischemic Attack clinical trials at UCSF
2 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • Ischemia Care Biomarkers of Acute Stroke Etiology (BASE)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The proposed study will validate the clinical use of new biomarker blood tests to identify blood components that may differentiate between diverse stroke etiologies and clinical outcomes as listed below: 1. Differentiate between cardioembolic and large artery atherosclerotic ischemic strokes, when hemorrhagic stroke is ruled out. 2. In cases of ischemic strokes of unknown or "cryptogenic" etiology, determine the ability of biomarker blood tests to predict etiology between cardioembolic and large artery atherosclerotic. 3. In cases of cardioembolic ischemic stroke, further differentiation of cardioembolic ischemic strokes into those caused by atrial fibrillation (AF) and those not caused by AF. 4. Differentiate "transient ischemic attacks" (TIAs) from acute ischemic strokes. 5. Differentiate TIAs from non-ischemic "transient neurological events" (TNE) with similar symptoms.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Platelet-Oriented Inhibition in New TIA and Minor Ischemic Stroke (POINT) Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia, without acute infarction. An ischemic stroke is a cerebral infarction. In POINT, eligibility is limited to brain TIAs and to minor ischemic strokes (with an NIH Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score less than or equal to 3). TIAs are common [25], and are often harbingers of disabling strokes. Approximately 250,000-350,000 TIAs are diagnosed each year in the US. Given median survival of more than 8 years [32], there are approximately 2.4 million TIA survivors. In a national survey, one in fifteen of those over 65 years old reported a history of TIA [33], which is equivalent to a prevalence of 2.3 million in older Americans. Based on the prevalence of undiagnosed transient neurological events, the true incidence of TIA may be twice as high as the rates of diagnosis [33]. Based on our review of the National Inpatient Sample for 1997-2003, there were an average of 200,000 hospital admissions for TIA each year, with annual charges climbing quickly in the period to $2.6 billion in 2003. Composite endpoint of new ischemic vascular events: ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction or ischemic vascular death at 90 days.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

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