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Hernia clinical trials at UCSF
4 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • Complex Ventral Hernia Repair Using Biologic or Synthetic Mesh

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Hernias are often treated using a prosthetic mesh to add support to the healing wound. Prosthetic meshes have been used for decades to repair ventral hernias, level 1 data regarding which type of mesh to use is limited. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, good and/or bad, of two types of prosthetic meshes: one that is made from pig skin (called a "biologic prosthetic"), and one that is made in a laboratory (called a "synthetic prosthetic"). This study will include some patients who have an infection in/near the hernia, and other patients who do not have an infection. We expect the synthetic mesh to be associated with a higher rate of early post-operative surgical site infection and fluid collections (seromas), while we expect the biologic mesh to be associated with a higher rate of recurrence.

    San Francisco, California

  • Endoscopic Gastric Plication for Weight Loss in Morbidly Obese Patients Prior to Incisional Hernia Repair

    open to eligible people ages 18–70

    Incisional hernias occur in nearly 20% of all laparotomy incisions accounting for almost 400,000 ventral hernia repairs annually in the United States. There is an even higher incidence of incisional hernia recurrence after prior repair if the patient is obese. Each subsequent hernia repair leads to increased morbidity and durability. It is not infrequent that many surgeons will advise overweight or obese patients to lose substantial weight prior to complex incisional hernia repair. However, it is quite difficult for any individual to lose more than 8 pounds a month in a safe, rapid, and sustainable fashion. This is based on losing 2 lbs. per week utilizing diet and exercise alone. Many patients with incisional hernia are physically debilitated that they cannot engage in any substantial physical activity to lose weight. Traditional laparoscopic bariatric surgery (i.e. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and SG), while feasible, is a technically challenging endeavor since prior abdominal surgeries increase the amount of intra-abdominal adhesions. Furthermore, there is still a subset of patients who are not candidates for laparoscopic weight loss surgery because of inability to tolerate pneumoperitoneum due to underlying physiologic dysfunction. - Novel minimally invasive endoscopic technique may help obese patients with an incisional hernia lose weight in a safe and rapid fashion. Early case reports and small case series on gastric bypass revision utilizing such endoscopic technique have shown promise in efficacious weight loss. There have been reports of achieving nearly 20-25% excess weight loss. Abu Dayyeh and colleagues have also demonstrated that endoscopic gastric plication as a primary weight loss procedure is feasible, but their reported follow-up was only 3 months.8 Brethauer, et al. from Cleveland Clinic performed transoral gastric volume reduction for weight management in 18 patients (TRIM TRIAL). They utilized the Restore Suturing System (Restore device) and reported a mean decrease in BMI of -4.0 ± 3.5 kg/m2. Mean excess weight loss was 27.7% ± 21.9% with no reports of adverse events.9 There have also been reports of not only weight loss but improved insulin sensitivity and secretion.10 Laparoscopic gastric greater curvature plication afforded a mean 50.7% excess weight loss at 12 months.11 The intent of this study is not to demonstrate endoscopic suturing to be a primary option for weight-loss surgery. Preliminary reports have shown such procedure is technically feasible but not durable and the effects of the procedure varied widely among the study participants.12 The investigators view this technology as a bridge for morbidly obese patients, who will need subsequent surgery for another surgical disease, to improve their body habitus and decrease their postoperative morbidity and mortality. The aims of the investigators study are: - Feasibility of endoscopic gastric sleeve plication - Define the technical aspects of endoscopic suturing for sleeve plication - Provide long-term follow-up for both weight loss and resolution of their co-morbidities - Time from the endoscopic procedure to their incisional hernia repair - Photographic evidence of the stomach after endoscopic plication during the incisional hernia repair There are several advantages for the proposed study. First it avoids entering the intra-abdominal cavity. Second, the procedure is performed solely with sutures obviating the need for stapling which may increase the risk of gastric leak from the staple line.13 Lastly, it avoids placing endoscopic intra-luminal devices such as intragastric balloons or duodenal-jejunal sleeves. Limiting factor of such devices is a high rate of premature device withdrawal due to intolerance. Furthermore, their effects are short-lived as most devices will need to be removed by 12 weeks and they only offer a mean 23.6% excess weight loss.13, 14 The implications of this study can be far-reaching. Once efficacy is demonstrated where enough weight loss is achieved that patients can safely and quickly undergo their incisional hernia surgery, the investigators can then conduct a retrospective case-control cross-matched study to further delineate its true benefit. If there is a true benefit, then a randomized control study can be employed in the future.

    San Francisco, California

  • A Study of Fibrin Sealant Plus Silver Microparticles to Prevent Incisional Hernias Following Abdominal Surgery

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Incisional hernias are a frequent consequence of abdominal surgery. Current clinical efforts are primarily focused on improving repair materials and surgical techniques to correct these hernias instead of the optimal solution: prevention. A product called MYOSEAL is currently being developed to prevent hernia formation after abdominal surgery by using fibrin tissue sealant and silver particles to prophylactically enhance the early wound healing of myofascial incisions. The purpose of this phase 1 study is to examine the safety of applying MYOSEAL immediately after abdominal wall suture closure in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. The investigators expect that applying this product to sutured myofascial incisions will increase collagen formation in the wound and thus prevent the formation of incisional hernias.

  • Percutaneous Endoscopic Tracheal Plug/Unplug for CDH

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is an anatomically simple birth defect in which contents of the fetal abdomen migrate into the chest due to incomplete formation of the diaphragm. Herniation of viscera into the chest prevents the fetal lungs from developing and growing to normal size. In the most severe cases, there is significant morbidity and mortality at birth. For these fetuses, fetal intervention may improve outcomes by enabling the lungs to grow enough in utero that they are capable of sustaining life after birth. This unblinded, non-randomized trial will assess the safety and efficacy of the use of the Goldvalve balloon and MiniTorquer microcatheter to perform percutaneous temporary tracheal occlusion to treat severe CDH in utero. The primary outcome variable will be fetal lung growth due to successful 'plugging/unplugging' of the trachea, as determined by serial lung-head ratio (LHR) measurements. Secondary outcome variables include maternal, fetal and neonatal variables, specifically neonatal survival at 90 days of life. For infants who survive beyond 90 days post-delivery, their families will be offered follow-up (up to 2 years of age and possibly beyond) in the Long-term Infant-to-Adult Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE) Clinic at UCSF.

    San Francisco, California