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Cirrhosis clinical trials at UCSF

9 in progress, 7 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of OCE-205 in Participants With Cirrhosis With Ascites Who Developed Hepatorenal Syndrome-Acute Kidney Injury

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    OCE-205 is being tested to treat participants who have developed Hepatorenal Syndrome-Acute Kidney Injury as a complication of cirrhosis with ascites. The study aims are to evaluate the safety and efficacy of OCE-205 at various doses. Participants will receive treatment by intravenous infusion. Participants will continue with this treatment until participants meets primary endpoint or any discontinuation criteria.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study to Assess the Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of Oral LPCN 1148 in Male Subjects With Cirrhosis of the Liver and Sarcopenia

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of LPCN 1148 in men with cirrhosis of the liver and sarcopenia.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Mild Hypothermia and Acute Kidney Injury in Liver Transplantation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), or worsening kidney function, is a common complication after liver transplantation (20-90% in published studies). Patients who experience AKI after liver transplantation have higher mortality, increased graft loss, longer hospital and intensive care unit stays, and more progression to chronic kidney disease compared with those who do not. In this study, half of the participants will have their body temperature cooled to slightly lower than normal (mild hypothermia) for a portion of the liver transplant operation, while the other half will have their body temperature maintained at normal. The study will evaluate if mild hypothermia protects from AKI during liver transplantation.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Multi-Center Study of the Effects of Simvastatin on Hepatic Decompensation and Death in Subjects Presenting With High-Risk Compensated Cirrhosis

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center study seeks to test whether simvastatin, a statin usually used to lower cholesterol to prevent heart problems and strokes, can lower the risk of hepatic decompensation (developing symptoms of cirrhosis) in U.S. Veterans who have compensated cirrhosis (the liver is scarred and damaged but there are no symptoms). The study will also explore how changes or differences in genes effect the safety and effectiveness of using statins and how the use of statins affects quality of life.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Semaglutide, and the Fixed-Dose Combination of Cilofexor and Firsocostat, Alone and in Combination, in Participants With Compensated Cirrhosis (F4) Due to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate whether the combination of semaglutide (SEMA) with the fixed-dose combination (FDC) of cilofexor/firsocostat (CILO/FIR) causes fibrosis improvement and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) resolution in participants with compensated cirrhosis due to NASH.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • ALTA TIPS: A 5-year Longitudinal Observational Study of Patients Undergoing TIPS Placement

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    ALTA is a multicenter consortium focused on the management of portal hypertension. ALTA TIPS is a longitudinal observational study of patients who are undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. ALTA will create a database that will provide clinical parameters and outcomes of patients undergoing TIPS as part of their standard of care in hopes of answering key clinical questions.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Case-Control Study of the Glycotest™ HCC Panel vs AFP for the Detection of Early-stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Clinical guidelines (AASLD) recommend the use of abdominal ultrasound (US) for surveillance testing for the early detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). The serum protein biomarker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is commonly used to augment US but its use alone is not recommended by clinical guidelines. Despite evidence that HCC surveillance improves early detection and reduces mortality from HCC, current HCC surveillance tests lack sensitivity, leaving a significant proportion of patients to present with late-stage disease. The Glycotest HCC Panel has shown better sensitivity than AFP, which is ineffective for the detection of early-stage HCC. This clinical study seeks to validate the Glycotest HCC Panel using a large multicenter cohort of cases and controls that includes patients diagnosed with early-stage HCC against a background of cirrhosis and cirrhotic patients without HCC (at risk) undergoing an established surveillance protocol.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Obeticholic Acid in Subjects With Compensated Cirrhosis Due to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate whether obeticholic acid (OCA; INT-747) can lead to histological improvement in fibrosis with no worsening of NASH in adults with compensated cirrhosis due to NASH.

    Fresno, California and other locations

  • Study of Aldafermin (NGM282) in Subjects With Compensated Cirrhosis (ALPINE 4)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    A multi-center evaluation of aldafermin in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in subjects with compensated cirrhosis.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Cirrhosis research studies include .

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