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Dyslipidemia clinical trials at UCSF
3 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • Effect of PCSK9 Inhibition on Cardiovascular Risk in Treated HIV Infection (EPIC-HIV Study)

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    Atherosclerosis in the setting of HIV infection is distinct and includes increased vascular inflammation, worsened endothelial function, and a predominance of non-calcified plaque. These outcomes can be assessed using specialized noninvasive imaging which strongly predict future CV events in the general population. PCSK9 has emerged as an important pharmacologic target for cholesterol lowering in the general population and recent studies among individuals without HIV have shown that PCSK9 inhibitor therapy is safely tolerated and significantly reduces major CV events in the general population. The investigators will perform a clinical trial of PCSK9 inhibition in the setting of HIV infection. This will be a randomized, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effects of PCSK9 inhibition on vascular inflammation, endothelial function, and non-calcified plaque using a PCSK9 inhibitor called alirocumab. This study will recruit 140 treated individuals with HIV who are aged 40 and older, with known CVD or risk factors for CVD and who have evidence of vascular inflammation at baseline. The primary and secondary objective of this study is to determine whether PCSK9 inhibition can improve arterial inflammation as assessed by FDG-PET/CT and endothelial function as assessed by flow mediated vasodilation. The investigators will correlate changes in arterial inflammation and endothelial function with lipids and markers of inflammation and immune activation. The tertiary objective is to perform a pilot evaluation of the impact of PCSK9 inhibition on non-calcified plaque as measured by coronary CT angiography. Non-calcified plaque measurements will be correlated with changes in lipid parameters and markers of inflammation and immune activation.

    San Francisco, California

  • Zinc Supplement Before or With Food in Generally Healthy Men

    open to eligible males ages 18-50

    The purpose of this study is to determine the influence of food consumption timing on the body's response to a zinc supplement

    Oakland, California

  • The Mediterranean Full-Fat Dairy Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    A Mediterranean dietary pattern emphasizing an abundance of plant-based foods including nuts, moderate intakes of fish, poultry and low-fat dairy products, and use of extra virgin olive oil as the main source of fat has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and such a pattern has been advocated by the 2015 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The strongest experimental support for this recommendation derives from the success of the recent PREDIMED CVD outcomes trial, and studies indicating that a Mediterranean-style diet improves lipoprotein and oxidative markers of cardiovascular disease risk in comparison to either low-fat or Western dietary patterns. However, in none of these studies were comparisons made between the effects of Mediterranean-style diets with low-/nonfat vs. full-fat dairy foods. The overall objective of the present proposal is to determine whether the inclusion of full-fat rather than low- and nonfat dairy foods in a Mediterranean dietary pattern based on that used in the PREDIMED study results in similar improvements in biomarkers of CVD risk. Specifically, we will test the hypotheses that 1) a standard Mediterranean diet will lower LDL-C and apoB compared to a Western diet; 2) modification of the Mediterranean diet by replacing low-fat dairy products with high-fat dairy (3 servings/day; high-dairy fat Mediterranean diet) will not significantly increase LDL-C and apoB but may raise large buoyant LDL particles compared with a standard Mediterranean diet; and 3) the high dairy fat and standard Mediterranean diets will result in comparable reductions in levels of inflammatory markers and oxidized LDL, and improvements in endothelial function compared to a Western diet.

    Berkeley, California

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