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Germ Cell Tumor clinical trials at UCSF

18 in progress, 10 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of a New Way to Treat Children and Young Adults With a Brain Tumor Called NGGCT

    open to eligible people ages 3-30

    This phase II trial studies the best approach to combine chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) based on the patient's response to induction chemotherapy in patients with non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCT) that have not spread to other parts of the brain or body (localized). This study has 2 goals: 1) optimizing radiation for patients who respond well to induction chemotherapy to diminish spinal cord relapses, 2) utilizing higher dose chemotherapy followed by conventional RT in patients who did not respond to induction chemotherapy. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, etoposide, ifosfamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays or high-energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Studies have shown that patients with newly-diagnosed localized NGGCT, whose disease responds well to chemotherapy before receiving radiation therapy, are more likely to be free of the disease for a longer time than are patients for whom the chemotherapy does not efficiently eliminate or reduce the size of the tumor. The purpose of this study is to see how well the tumors respond to induction chemotherapy to decide what treatment to give next. Some patients will be given RT to the spine and a portion of the brain. Others will be given high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant before RT to the whole brain and spine. Giving treatment based on the response to induction chemotherapy may lower the side effects of radiation in some patients and adjust the therapy to a more efficient one for other patients with localized NGGCT.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Etoposide, Carboplatin or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients With Germ Cell Tumors

    open to all eligible people

    This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors for recurrence after their tumor is removed. When the germ cell tumors has spread outside of the organ in which it developed, it is considered metastatic. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The trial studies whether carboplatin or cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy to use in treating metastatic standard risk germ cell tumors.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Ivosidenib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With IDH1 Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ivosidenib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have IDH1 genetic alterations (mutations). Ivosidenib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in an important signaling pathway called the IDH pathway.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Larotrectinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With NTRK Fusions (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well larotrectinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with NTRK fusions that may have spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced) and have come back (relpased) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Larotrectinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Samotolisib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With TSC or PI3K/MTOR Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well samotolisib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with TSC or PI3K/MTOR mutations that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Samotolisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Selpercatinib for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Histiocytic Disorders With Activating RET Gene Alterations, a Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II pediatric MATCH trial studies how well selpercatinib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have activating RET gene alterations. Selpercatinib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in an important signaling pathway (called the RET pathway) and may reduce tumor size.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    open to eligible males ages 14 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Pediatric Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, or Histiocytic Disorders (The Pediatric MATCH Screening Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and/or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Tipifarnib for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With HRAS Gene Alterations, a Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II pediatric MATCH trial studies how well tipifarnib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have recurred or spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders, that have a genetic alteration in the gene HRAS. Tipifarnib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in a gene called HRAS and may reduce tumor size.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Collecting and Storing Tissue From Young Patients With Cancer

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This laboratory study is collecting and storing tissue, blood, and bone marrow samples from young patients with cancer. Collecting and storing samples of tissue, blood, and bone marrow from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that may occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Ensartinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With ALK or ROS1 Genomic Alterations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ensartinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with ALK or ROS1 genomic alterations that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory) and have spread to other places in the body (advanced). Ensartinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Erdafitinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With FGFR Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well erdafitinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment with FGFR mutations. Erdafitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells with FGFR mutations by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed central nervous system germ cell tumors that have not spread to other parts of the brain, spinal canal, or body (localized). Drugs used as chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, etoposide, and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Olaparib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With Defects in DNA Damage Repair Genes (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well olaparib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with defects in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage repair genes that have spread to other places in the body (advanced) and have come back (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, an enzyme that helps repair DNA when it becomes damaged. Blocking PARP may help keep cancer cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Palbociclib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rb Positive Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With Activating Alterations in Cell Cycle Genes (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well palbociclib works in treating patients with Rb positive solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with activating alterations (mutations) in cell cycle genes that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Palbociclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Tazemetostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With EZH2, SMARCB1, or SMARCA4 Gene Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well tazemetostat works in treating patients with brain tumors, solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have come back (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory) and have EZH2, SMARCB1, or SMARCA4 gene mutations. Tazemetostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking EZH2 and its relation to some of the pathways needed for cell proliferation.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Ulixertinib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With MAPK Pathway Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ulixertinib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have a genetic alteration (mutation) in a signaling pathway called MAPK. A signaling pathway consists of a group of molecules in a cell that control one or more cell functions. Genes in the MAPK pathway are frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Ulixertinib may stop the growth of cancer cells that have mutations in the MAPK pathway.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Vemurafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With BRAF V600 Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well vemurafenib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with BRAF V600 mutations that have spread to other places in the body (advanced) and have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Vemurafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Germ Cell Tumor research studies include .

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