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Gliosarcoma clinical trials at UCSF

6 in progress, 0 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Adavosertib and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Children With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of adavosertib when given together with local radiation therapy in treating children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons, or other sources to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving adavosertib with local radiation therapy may work better than local radiation therapy alone in treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Ipilimumab and/or Nivolumab in Combination With Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma or Gliosarcoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the safety and best dose of ipilimumab, nivolumab, or both in combination with temozolomide in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma or gliosarcoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known which combination is a better treatment for glioblastoma or gliosarcoma.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Sapanisertib Before and After Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This partially randomized pilot phase I trial studies how much sapanisertib reaches the brain tumor and how well it works when given before and after surgery in treating patients with glioblastoma that has grown or come back and requires surgery. Sapanisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Temozolomide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well temozolomide and veliparib work compared to temozolomide alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether temozolomide is more effective with or without veliparib in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Vaccine Therapy With Bevacizumab Versus Bevacizumab Alone in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving vaccine therapy with or without bevacizumab works in treating patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme that can be removed by surgery. Vaccines consisting of heat shock protein-peptide complexes made from a person's own tumor tissue may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that may remain after surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them. It is not yet known whether giving vaccine therapy is more effective with or without bevacizumab in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Vorinostat and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Malignant Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of vorinostat when given together with temozolomide in treating patients with malignant gliomas. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vorinostat and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Vorinostat may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Vorinostat may help temozolomide work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Giving vorinostat together with temozolomide may kill more tumor cells.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Gliosarcoma research studies include .

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