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Hepatocellular Carcinoma clinical trials at UCSF

24 in progress, 12 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Longitudinal Observational Study of the Natural History and Management of Patients With HCC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    TARGET-HCC is a longitudinal, observational study of patients being managed for HCC in usual clinical practice. TARGET-HCC will create a research registry of participants with HCC within academic and community real-world practices in order to assess the safety and effectiveness of the entire spectrum of current and future therapies across diverse populations.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Case-Control Study of the Glycotest™ HCC Panel vs AFP for the Detection of Early-stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Clinical guidelines (AASLD) recommend the use of abdominal ultrasound (US) for surveillance testing for the early detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). The serum protein biomarker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is commonly used to augment US but its use alone is not recommended by clinical guidelines. Despite evidence that HCC surveillance improves early detection and reduces mortality from HCC, current HCC surveillance tests lack sensitivity, leaving a significant proportion of patients to present with late-stage disease. The Glycotest HCC Panel has shown better sensitivity than AFP, which is ineffective for the detection of early-stage HCC. This clinical study seeks to validate the Glycotest HCC Panel using a large multicenter cohort of cases and controls that includes patients diagnosed with early-stage HCC against a background of cirrhosis and cirrhotic patients without HCC (at risk) undergoing an established surveillance protocol.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Checkpoint Inhibition In Pediatric Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This research study is studying an immunotherapy drug (pembrolizumab or KEYTRUDA) as a possible treatment for pediatric hepatocellular carcinoma or hepatocellular neoplasm not otherwise specified (HCN NOS).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Cisplatin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children and Young Adults With Hepatoblastoma or Liver Cancer After Surgery

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This partially randomized phase II/III trial studies how well, in combination with surgery, cisplatin and combination chemotherapy works in treating children and young adults with hepatoblastoma or hepatocellular carcinoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, fluorouracil, vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, etoposide, irinotecan, sorafenib, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells than one type of chemotherapy alone.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Followed by Durvalumab With or Without Tremelimumab for the Treatment of Liver Cancer After Progression on Prior PD-1 Inhibition

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well standard of care hypofractionated radiation therapy followed by durvalumab with or without tremelimumab works in treating patients with hepatocellular cancer (liver cancer) that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) and that is growing, spreading, or getting worse (progressing) after treatment with PD-1 inhibitor immunotherapy. In some patients, cancer cells and immune cells start to express signals that stop the body's immune system from killing the cancer. New drugs being developed, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, are designed to target and block these signals and may help increase the immune response to prevent or slow down cancer growth. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may help the immune system work even better. Giving durvalumab with or without tremelimumab after radiation therapy may work better than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with liver cancer.

    San Francisco, California

  • Mild Hypothermia and Acute Kidney Injury in Liver Transplantation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), or worsening kidney function, is a common complication after liver transplantation (20-90% in published studies). Patients who experience AKI after liver transplantation have higher mortality, increased graft loss, longer hospital and intensive care unit stays, and more progression to chronic kidney disease compared with those who do not. In this study, half of the participants will have their body temperature cooled to slightly lower than normal (mild hypothermia) for a portion of the liver transplant operation, while the other half will have their body temperature maintained at normal. The study will evaluate if mild hypothermia protects from AKI during liver transplantation.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • National Translational Science Network of Precision-based Immunotherapy for Primary Liver Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Background: Primary Liver Cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. It is the cancer with the fastest rising incidence and mortality in the United States. Researchers want to learn more about liver cancer to help them design better treatments. Objective: To better understand liver cancer. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have liver cancer and had or are planning to have immune therapy Design: Participants will be screened with a review of their medical records. They will be asked about their medical history and test results. Participants will come to the NIH Clinical Center. During this visit, their medical records, test results, imaging studies, and tissue samples (if available) will be gathered. Participants will learn the results of a test to see if they have any mutations known to be connected to cancer. They will learn if there are treatment options for them. Participants will give blood, urine, and stool samples or rectal swabs. Participants will not have follow-up visits just for this study. If they join another NIH research study and have visits for this other study, their medical records; test results; and blood, urine, and stool samples may be collected. This will occur about every 3 months. If they have a biopsy or surgery on another study or as part of treatment and there is leftover tissue, researchers would like to collect some of that tissue. Participants will be contacted every 6 months by phone or e-mail. They will be asked about their health. They will provide any medical records, test results, and imaging studies. Participants will be followed on this study for life.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Pembrolizumab Plus Lenvatinib in Combination With Belzutifan in Solid Tumors (MK-6482-016)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of belzutifan in combination with pembrolizumab and lenvatinib in multiple solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), biliary tract cancer (BTC), endometrial cancer (EC),and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). There is no formal hypothesis testing in this study.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer that are spreading to other places in the body (metastatic). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. This trial is being done to determine if giving radiation therapy to patients who are being treated with immunotherapy and whose cancers are progressing (getting worse) can slow or stop the growth of their cancers. It may also help researchers determine if giving radiation therapy to one tumor can stimulate the immune system to attack other tumors in the body that are not targeted by the radiation therapy.

    San Francisco, California

  • Sorafenib and Nivolumab in Treating Participants With Unresectable, Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the best dose and side effects of sorafenib tosylate and nivolumab in treating patients with liver cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or to other places in the body (metastatic). Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving sorafenib tosylate and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with liver cancer.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study of SRF388 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/1b, open-label, first-in-human, dose-escalation and expansion study of SRF388, a monoclonal antibody that targets IL-27, as a monotherapy and in combination in patients with solid tumors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Testing the Addition of an Experimental Medication MK-3475 (Pembrolizumab) to Usual Anti-Retroviral Medications in Patients With HIV and Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malignant neoplasms that have come back (relapsed), do not respond to treatment (refractory), or have distributed over a large area in the body (disseminated). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of XmAb®20717 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending dose escalation study to define a MTD/RD and regimen of XmAb20717, to describe safety and tolerability, to assess PK and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess anti-tumor activity of XmAb20717 in subjects with selected advanced solid tumors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of Lenvatinib in Participants With Advanced or Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The primary purpose of this study is to further characterise the hepatotoxicity in participants with advanced or unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with lenvatinib, and to further characterise the overall safety profile (serious adverse events [SAEs], grade 3 to 5 adverse events [AEs], dose modifications and discontinuations due to AEs) in participants with advanced or unresectable HCC treated with lenvatinib.

    Clovis, California and other locations

  • An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study of Nivolumab Compared to Sorafenib as a First Treatment in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine if nivolumab or sorafenib is more effective in the treatment of Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works in treating younger patients with sarcomas, Wilms tumor, or other rare tumors that have come back, do not respond to therapy, or are newly diagnosed. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth and tumor blood vessel growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Chemoembolization With or Without Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies chemoembolization and sorafenib tosylate to see how well they work compared with chemoembolization alone in treating patients with liver cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, mitomycin, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Chemoembolization kills tumor cells by carrying drugs directly into blood vessels near the tumor and then blocking the blood flow to allow a higher concentration of the drug to reach the tumor for a longer period of time. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving chemoembolization together with sorafenib tosylate is more effective than chemoembolization alone in treating patients with liver cancer.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Dose-defining Study of Tirapazamine Combined With Embolization in Liver Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase 1 study is to determine the optimal dose and tolerability of a hypoxia-activating agent, tirapazamine, when it is combined with embolization in liver cancer. Liver cancer patients who are Child-Pugh score A, suitable for embolization with tumor no more than 4 nodules are eligible. Tirapazamine will be given by intra-arterial injection before embolization. Treatment effect is evaluated by MRI based on mRECIST criteria. Repeat treatment is necessary only if disease progression. Dose escalation cohort has been completed. Expansion cohort is open for metastatic liver dominant neuroendocrine tumor.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • GB1275 Monotherapy and in Combination With an Anti-PD1 Antibody in Patients With Specified Advanced Solid Tumors or in Combination With Standard of Care in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This first-in-human (FIH ) study is an open-label, multicenter study that consists of a Phase 1 Dose Escalation/Expansion phase of GB1275 monotherapy or in combination with Anti-PD-1 Antibody or in combination with Standard of Care in Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma followed by a Phase 2 Basket Expansion phase in Patients with Specified Metastatic Solid Tumors

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Safety and Efficacy of Everolimus Treatment in Liver Transplantation for Liver Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is a prospective Phase IV study to determine if the use of Everolimus results in lower liver tumor recurrence and improved patient and graft survival after liver transplant for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The immunosuppressive comparators will be Everolimus and Tacrolimus therapy compared to Tacrolimus and Mycophenolic acid/Mycophenolate Mofetil/Azathioprine. Primary outcomes data is disease free survival (the time from randomization to HCC recurrence or death). Secondary outcomes are rate of recurrence of Hepatitis C, problems related to wound healing, hernia repair within the first 12 months, hepatic arterial thrombosis, renal function, acute cellular rejection, post-transplant diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies sorafenib tosylate and doxorubicin hydrochloride to see how well they work compared with sorafenib tosylate alone in treating patients with liver cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes or has spread to other places in the body. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether giving sorafenib tosylate together with doxorubicin hydrochloride is more effective than sorafenib tosylate alone in treating liver cancer.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies sorafenib tosylate and stereotactic body radiation therapy to see how well they work compared to sorafenib tosylate alone in treating patients with liver cancer. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Stereotactic body radiation therapy may be able to send the radiation dose directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving sorafenib tosylate together with stereotactic body radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) as Monotherapy in Participants With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (MK-3475-224/KEYNOTE-224)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a efficacy and safety study of pembrolizumab (MK-3475, KEYTRUDA®) as monotherapy in participants with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in two cohorts: participants with advanced HCC and with no curative option after disease progression on sorafenib or intolerance of sorafenib (Cohort 1) or who had not received treatment for systemic disease (Cohort 2). Study participants may receive pembrolizumab once every 3 weeks for up to 35 initial cycles (up to approximately 2 years) and a potential additional 17 cycles in a re-treatment phase (approximately an additional 1 year of treatment) . The primary objective of this study is to determine the Objective Response Rate (ORR) of pembrolizumab given as monotherapy in participants with HCC. Effective with Amendment 7: Upon study completion, participants are discontinued and may be enrolled in a pembrolizumab extension study, if available.

  • TPST-1120 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Nivolumab in Subjects With Advanced Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a phase 1/1b open label, multicenter dose escalation and dose expansion study to investigate the safety, tolerability and anti-tumor activity of TPST-1120, a small molecule selective antagonist of PPARα (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha) as monotherapy and in combination with a systemic anticancer agent, nivolumab, an anti-PD1 antibody, in subjects with advanced solid tumors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Hepatocellular Carcinoma research studies include .

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