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Nerve Injury clinical trials at UCSF

3 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 22-80

    Chronic pain affects 1 in 4 US adults, and many cases are resistant to almost any treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but traditional approaches target only brain regions involved in one aspect of the pain experience and provide continuous 24/7 brain stimulation which may lose effect over time. By developing new technology that targets multiple, complimentary brain regions in an adaptive fashion, the investigators will test a new therapy for chronic pain that has potential for better, more enduring analgesia.

    San Francisco, California

  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Chronic neuropathic pain is defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. It is highly prevalent, debilitating, and challenging to treat. Current available treatments have low efficacy, high side effect burden, and are prone to misuse and dependence. Emerging evidence suggests that the transition from acute to chronic neuropathic pain is associated with reorganization of central brain circuits involved in pain processing. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising alternative treatment that uses focused magnetic pulses to non-invasively modulate brain activity, a strategy that can potentially circumvent the adverse effects of available treatments for pain. RTMS is FDA-approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and migraine, and has been shown to reduce pain scores when applied to the contralateral motor cortex (M1). However, available studies of rTMS for chronic neuropathic pain typically show variable and often short-lived benefits, and many aspects of optimal treatment remain unknown, including ideal rTMS stimulation parameters, duration of treatment, and relationship to the underlying pain etiology. Here the investigators propose to evaluate the efficacy of high frequency rTMS to M1, the region with most evidence of benefit in chronic neuropathic pain, and to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify alternative rTMS targets for participants that do not respond to stimulation at M1. The central aim is to evaluate the pain relieving efficacy of multi-session high-frequency M1 TMS for pain. In secondary exploratory analyses, the investigator propose to investigate patient characteristic that are predictive of responsive to M1 rTMS and identify viable alternative stimulation targets in non-responders to M1 rTMS.

    San Francisco, California

  • Trial of Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy Induced Paresthesia Using Ultrasonic vs. Reciprocating Saw Instrumentation

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The aim of this prospective study is to analyze the postoperative paresthesias experienced in patients who undergo bilateral sagittal split osteotomies (BSSO) using an ultrasonic saw, versus a reciprocating saw. Patients included in the study are ages 15-45 scheduled to undergo BSSO surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. One side of the patient's mandible will be instrumented with either the Stryker Sonopet ultrasonic saw or traditional reciprocating saw, while the other side will receive the remaining intervention (determined via randomization on the day of surgery). Patient paresthesias will then be analyzed on each side for 3 months postoperatively (at postoperative days: 1, 7, 14, 28, and 84). Sensory examinations will be carried out by blinded examiners using von Frey hairs and two point discrimination testing. Patients will also subjectively rate their sensation on each side. The results will then be analyzed to determine if patient paresthesias, including the severity and duration, differed depending on which instrument was used, the ultrasonic or reciprocating saw.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Nerve Injury research studies include .

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