Skip to main content

Neuroendocrine Carcinoma clinical trials at UCSF

6 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Selpercatinib (LOXO-292) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer (LIBRETTO-001)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is an open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of selpercatinib (also known as LOXO-292) administered orally to participants with advanced solid tumors, including rearranged during transfection (RET)-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Apalutamide Plus Cetrelimab in Patients With Treatment-Emergent Small Cell Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    Despite the low androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity of treatment-emergent small cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer, there is persistent AR expression observed in the majority of treatment-emergent small-cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer (t-SCNC) biopsies. This indicates that epigenetic dysregulation leads to reprogramming away from an AR-driven transcriptional program. Therefore, continuation of AR blockade in the form of apalutamide may provide additive benefit compared to immune checkpoint blockade alone. The investigators hypothesize that the combination of apalutamide plus cetrelimab will achieve a clinically significant composite response rate with sufficient durability of response in mCRPC patients with evidence of treatment-emergent small cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer

    San Francisco, California

  • Tiragolumab and Atezolizumab for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory SMARCB1 or SMARCA4 Deficient Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months and up

    This phase I/II trial studies how well tiragolumab and atezolizumab works when given to children and adults with SMARCB1 or SMARCA4 deficient tumors that that has either come back (relapsed) or does not respond to therapy (refractory). SMARCB1 or SMARCA4 deficiency means that tumor cells are missing the SMARCB1 and SMARCA4 genes, seen with some aggressive cancers that are typically hard to treat. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as tiragolumab and atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Natural History of Medullary Thyroid Cancer to Inform Advanced Disease Management

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study utilizes a multi-institutional registry to describe the natural history of medullary thyroid cancer that has spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced) in understanding disease management. The goal of this study is to learn about how medullary thyroid cancer develops and progresses.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works in treating younger patients with sarcomas, Wilms tumor, or other rare tumors that have come back, do not respond to therapy, or are newly diagnosed. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth and tumor blood vessel growth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Cisplatin, Carboplatin and Etoposide or Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Gastrointestinal Tract or Pancreas That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well temozolomide and capecitabine work compared to standard treatment with cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide in treating patients with neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract or pancreas that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, capecitabine, cisplatin, carboplatin and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Certain types of neuroendocrine carcinomas may respond better to treatments other than the current standard treatment of cisplatin and etoposide. It is not yet known whether temozolomide and capecitabine may work better than cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide in treating patients with this type of neuroendocrine carcinoma, called non-small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Neuroendocrine Carcinoma research studies include .

Last updated: