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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome clinical trials at UCSF
4 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

  • Continuous Versus Cyclical OCP Use in PCOS

    open to eligible females ages 16-35

    The mainstay treatment for females with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has long been a combination of an oral contraceptive pill or OCP (containing both estrogen and progestin) along with an anti-androgen medication (such as Spironolactone) to not only prevent chronic anovulation but also suppress elevated testosterone levels and its clinical effects on the body. While there are multiple OCPs available on the market today and several studies that look at different progestins and their anti-androgenicity, not much is known about whether the length of active pills in OCP therapy (3 weeks versus 6 months) has any further benefit in continued suppression of testosterone and subsequently improvement in clinical findings of hyperandrogenism in the PCOS population. In this pilot randomized open label clinical trial, females between the ages of 16 and 35 years diagnosed with PCOS based on the Rotterdam Criteria, and not currently on medical therapy with an OCP will be enrolled in the study and randomized to either a continuous 6 month OCP or cyclical 21 day active OCP therapy. Our aim is to conduct a pilot randomized clinical trial to determine the effect of 6 months of active monophasic OCPs on testosterone levels and cutaneous findings of hyperandrogenism (hirsutism and acne) as compared to a traditional 21 day active/7 day placebo OCP in women with PCOS. These findings will be compared over a 6 month period.

    San Francisco, California

  • Metformin, Vitamin D, and Depression in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Trial

    open to eligible females ages 18-45

    Open-label randomized clinical trial assessing the efficacy of Metformin versus Vitamin D in improving symptoms of depressed mood in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    San Francisco, California

  • Paleo Versus Healthy ADA Diets for Treatment of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

    open to eligible females ages 18-40

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a syndrome which includes elevated androgen levels, irregular menstrual cycles and insulin resistance. Standard treatments, which include weight loss and medications to improve insulin secretion are only partly successful, and may require that young women take medications for decades. The study investigators have been evaluating the effects of specific diets on insulin resistance in healthy volunteers and subjects with type 2 diabetes, and have found that subjects with insulin resistance seem to respond particularly well to these diet regimens. Volunteers with PCOS are being asked to participate to see if following these diets can help regularize your menstrual cycles. The results of this study may help improve fertility treatments for women with PCOS.

    San Francisco, California

  • Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Elagolix in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will assess the potential impact of Elagolix on disordered pituitary and ovarian hormones in women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

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