Skip to main content

Postoperative Pain clinical trials at UCSF

7 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 22-80

    Chronic pain affects 1 in 4 US adults, and many cases are resistant to almost any treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but traditional approaches target only brain regions involved in one aspect of the pain experience and provide continuous 24/7 brain stimulation which may lose effect over time. By developing new technology that targets multiple, complimentary brain regions in an adaptive fashion, the investigators will test a new therapy for chronic pain that has potential for better, more enduring analgesia.

    San Francisco, California

  • Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Intercostal Nerve Block Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Intercostal Nerve Block Trial is a single center, double-blind, randomized, active-comparator controlled clinical trial to assess the analgesic efficacy of intercostal nerve block by Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Standard Bupivacaine in subjects undergoing lung resection by robotic or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

    San Francisco, California

  • Optimizing Acute Post-Operative Dental Pain Management Using New Health Information Technology

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The investigators seek to implement a dental patient reported outcomes system using mobile phone and text messaging to target the over-reliance on pre-emptively prescribed opioids by dental providers. If successful, this project will help dentists actively track and manage their patients' pain after hours and enhance the overall care experience.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Major Lower Extremity Amputations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will be a double-blinded randomized controlled trial analyzing all patients who will undergo major lower extremity amputations by the vascular surgery service at UCSF Fresno between July 2017 and June 2018 to determine if regional nerve blocks (sciatic and femoral) have any effect on postoperative pain control, narcotic requirements, and length of stay compared with standard post-operative narcotic regimens.

    Fresno, California

  • Erector Spinae Plane Blocks (ESP) for Postoperative Pain in Lumbo-sacral Spine Surgery

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of bilateral erector spinae plane (ESP) blocks after lumbar and lumbo-sacral spine surgery by assessing postoperative pain scores and opiate requirements as the primary outcome measures. We are aiming to investigate how ESP blocks, performed under ultrasound guidance at the T12 vertebral level, contribute to postoperative pain control. This will be determined by measuring numerical rating pain scores repeatedly following surgery and opiate consumption until patient discharge from hospital. These primary outcome measures will be compared between a treatment group of participants, who will receive ESP blocks and a control group who will receive a sham block. Our primary hypothesis is that ESP blocks significantly reduce postoperative pain and opiate requirements

    San Francisco, California

  • The Effect of Liposomal Bupivacaine on Post Operative Pain and Narcotic Use After Bariatric Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is prospective, randomized trial in which the efficacy of liposomal bupivacaine (Exparel®) is compared to standard bupivacaine local surgical site injection in reducing total IV and oral morphine equivalents required after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Liposomal bupivacaine is a 72-hour bupivacaine that is slowly released from tissue over the course of three days. Having a long acting local anesthetic should provide better pain control than conventional bupivacaine which has a 3.5-hour half-life. In some studies, the use of liposomal bupivacaine has been shown to decrease pain and narcotic use after surgery. This has not yet been studied in bariatric patients and the use of liposomal bupivacaine can potentially improve patient post-operative pain control, decrease narcotic use, decrease hospital length of stay and readmission rates and improve patient satisfaction after bariatric surgery.

    Fresno, California

  • The Effect of Pectoral Blocks on Perioperative Pain in Gender Affirmation Top Surgery

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Despite recent advancements with regional and local anesthesia, postoperative pain continues to be a major concern for patients undergoing breast surgery. Opioids, often in combination with NSAIDS and/or gabapentioids, have been the main pharmacologic pain control strategy in the postoperative period. The pectoral nerve block is a regional anesthetic technique, which is effective at providing postoperative anesthesia in breast surgeries. However, this has only been studied in oncologic-related breast operations. It is our aim to study the effects of pectoral regional nerve blocks in patients undergoing breast reduction for gender affirmation. The overall goal is to establish an effective pain control regimen utilizing regional anesthetic techniques in this patient population. The specific objective of this proposal is to evaluate the effectiveness of these blocks on perioperative and postoperative analgesia. The hypothesis is that participants undergoing gender-affirmation breast surgery who receive a pectoral nerve block will have less perioperative and postoperative pain as well as reduced opioid consumption compared to those receiving a placebo. Participants who are undergoing gender affirmation breast reduction surgery will be randomized to either receive a preoperative nerve block or to receive a placebo. Intraoperative and postoperative opioid requirements will be compared in addition to post-operative pain scores. Participants will be asked to fill out a pain diary during their first week postoperatively. They will also be asked to document if, and when, narcotic pain medication was required for pain control. The two groups will be compared to determine if there was any difference in pain scores as well as narcotic medication requirements.

    San Francisco, California

Last updated: