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Postoperative Pulmonary Complications clinical trials at UCSF

1 research study open to eligible people

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  • An Anesthesia-Centered Bundle to Reduce Postoperative Pulmonary Complications: The PRIME-AIR Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. National estimates suggest 1,062,000 PPCs per year, with 46,200 deaths, and 4.8 million additional days of hospitalization. Abdominal surgery is the field with the largest absolute number of PPCs. Our long-term goal is to develop and implement perioperative strategies to eliminate PPCs. Whereas PPCs are as significant and lethal as cardiac complications, research in the field has received much less attention, and strategies to minimize PPCs are regrettably limited. Recently, we and others have suggested a crucial role of anesthesia related interventions such as ventilatory strategies, and administration and reversal of neuromuscular blocking agents in reducing PPCs. These findings are consistent with the beneficial effects of lung protective ventilation during the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). While surgical patients differ substantially from ARDS patients as most have no or limited lung injury at the start of surgery, intraoperative anesthetic and abdominal surgery interventions result in lung derecruitment and predispose to or produce direct and indirect, potentially multiple-hit, lung injury. Thus, effective anesthetic strategies aiming at early lung protection in this group of patients are greatly needed. Indeed, the current lack of evidence results in wide and unexplained variability in anesthetic practices creating a major public health issue as some practices within usual care appear to be suboptimal and even potentially injurious. We hypothesize that an anesthesia-centered bundle, based on our recent findings and focused on perioperative lung protection, will minimize multiple and synergistic factors responsible for the multiple-hit perioperative pulmonary dysfunction and result in decreased incidence and severity of PPCs. Founded on strong preliminary data, we will leverage a network of US academic centers to study this hypothesis in two aims: Aim 1. To compare the number and severity of PPCs in patients receiving an individualized perioperative anesthesia-centered bundle to those in patients receiving usual anesthetic care during open abdominal surgery. For this, we propose to conduct a prospective multicenter randomized controlled pragmatic trial with a blinded assessor in a total of 750 patients. The bundle will consist of optimal mechanical ventilation comprising individualized positive end-expiratory pressure to maximize respiratory system compliance and minimize driving pressures, individualized use of neuromuscular blocking agents and their reversal, and postoperative lung expansion and early mobilization; Aim 2. To assess the effect of the proposed bundle on plasma levels of lung injury biomarkers. We theorize that our intervention will minimize overinflation and atelectasis reducing plasma levels of biomarkers of lung inflammatory, epithelial, and endothelial injury. Such mechanistic insights will facilitate bundle dissemination and support adoption as it has for lung protective ventilation for ARDS. At the end of this project, we expect to change clinical practice by establishing a new and clinically feasible anesthesia-centered strategy to reduce perioperative lung morbidity.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

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