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Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis clinical trials at UCSF
2 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • Vitamin D Supplementation in Multiple Sclerosis

    open to eligible people ages 18–50

    Low vitamin D levels have been shown to increase a person's risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), and patients with MS who have lower vitamin D levels are at increased risk of having attacks. However, it is not known if giving supplemental vitamin D to those with MS reduces the risk of attacks, and some research suggests that vitamin D could even be harmful to people with MS. In this clinical trial, patients with relapsing-remitting MS will receive high-dose or low-dose oral vitamin D in addition to an approved therapy for MS, glatiramer acetate. Patients will be evaluated for two years, and the effect of high-dose vitamin D supplementation on the rate of MS attacks and on the number of new lesions and change in brain volume on MRI will be determined. Establishing this association will have major implications for the treatment of individuals with MS throughout the world.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of Ocrelizumab in Participants With Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Who Have Had a Suboptimal Response to an Adequate Course of Disease-Modifying Treatment (DMT)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of ocrelizumab in participants with RRMS who have had a suboptimal response to an adequate course of DMT. Participants will receive ocrelizumab as an initial dose of two 300-milligrams (mg) intravenous (IV) infusions (600 mg total) separated by 14 days followed by one 600-mg IV infusion for a maximum of 4 doses (up to 96 weeks). Anticipated time on study treatment is 96 weeks.

    San Francisco, California and other locations