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Respiratory Distress Syndrome clinical trials at UCSF

4 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Acetaminophen and Ascorbate in Sepsis: Targeted Therapy to Enhance Recovery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Prospective multi-center phase 2b randomized placebo-controlled double-blinded interventional platform trial of two different pharmacologic therapies (intravenous Vitamin C or intravenous Acetaminophen) for patients with sepsis-induced hypotension or respiratory failure.

    Fresno, California and other locations

  • Mesenchymal Stromal Cells For Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 2b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center study to assess the safety and efficacy of a single dose of Allogeneic Bone Marrow-derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hMSCs) infusion in patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). This study is the extension of the Phase 1 pilot study (NCT01775774) and Phase 2a study (NCT02097641).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • ACTIV-3b: Therapeutics for Severely Ill Inpatients With COVID-19

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study looks at the safety and effectiveness of different drugs in treating COVID-19 in people who have been hospitalized with the infection and who have acute respiratory failure. Participants in the study will be treated with either a study drug plus current standard of care (SOC), or with placebo plus current SOC.

    Fresno, California and other locations

  • PROSpect: Prone and Oscillation Pediatric Clinical Trial

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) is a life-threatening and frequent problem experienced by thousands of children each year. Little evidence supports current supportive practices during their critical illness. The overall objective of this study is to identify the best positional and/or ventilation practice that leads to improved patient outcomes in these critically ill children. We hypothesize that children with high moderate-severe PARDS treated with either prone positioning or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) will demonstrate more days off the ventilator when compared to children treated with supine positioning or conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Respiratory Distress Syndrome research studies include .

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