Summary

healthy people welcome
at San Francisco, California
study started
estimated completion:
Valerie Flaherman

Description

Summary

Weight loss is normal for healthy newborns in the first few days, especially for those exclusively breastfed, who may have low enteral intake for several days. Although most newborns tolerate this early period of weight loss well, those with pronounced weight loss become at increased risk of feeding problems and hyperbilirubinemia, which are the two most common causes of neonatal readmission. To facilitate the assessment of risk for an individual newborn, the Newborn Weight Tool (NEWT) has been developed to categorize each infant's weight loss according to population norms, so that formula can be administered when weight loss is pronounced and avoided when weight loss is normal. The Healthy Start study will be a randomized, controlled trial testing whether displaying NEWT to clinicians providing newborn care can improve neonatal health outcomes including formula use, weight loss and readmission. Newborns will be randomly assigned either to display weight with NEWT weight categorization to their providers in the electronic health record (EHR) or to usual care (weight displayed without NEWT categorization).

Official Title

Beginning With a Healthy Start: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Informatics-Enhanced Newborn Weight Management

Keywords

Breastfeeding Breastfeeding, Exclusive Morbidity;Perinatal Feeding, Bottle formula NEWT Usual care Newborn Weight Tool (NEWT)

Eligibility

You can join if…

  • Assignment to a bed assignment on the well newborn service at the time of the first weight measured subsequent to birth weight and at >6 hours and <=96 hours of age

You CAN'T join if...

Location

  • University of California, San Francisco Medical Center accepting new patients
    San Francisco California 94122 United States

Details

Status
accepting new patients
Start Date
Completion Date
(estimated)
Sponsor
University of California, San Francisco
ID
NCT03655314
Lead Scientist
Valerie Flaherman
Study Type
Interventional
Last Updated