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Acute Kidney Injury clinical trials at UCSF

5 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Liberation From Acute Dialysis

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of the LIBERATE-D clinical trial is to improve outcomes for patients recovering from dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury (AKI-D). The impact of a conservative dialysis strategy compared to standard clinical practice of thrice-weekly dialysis will be examined to help generate knowledge for how to guide delivery of dialysis to facilitate renal recovery.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Mild Hypothermia and Acute Kidney Injury in Liver Transplantation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), or worsening kidney function, is a common complication after liver transplantation (20-90% in published studies). Patients who experience AKI after liver transplantation have higher mortality, increased graft loss, longer hospital and intensive care unit stays, and more progression to chronic kidney disease compared with those who do not. In this study, half of the participants will have their body temperature cooled to slightly lower than normal (mild hypothermia) for a portion of the liver transplant operation, while the other half will have their body temperature maintained at normal. The study will evaluate if mild hypothermia protects from AKI during liver transplantation.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Transfusion Trigger After Operations in High Cardiac Risk Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of the proposed study is to determine whether a liberal transfusion strategy (transfusion trigger at Hb < 10 gm/dl) in Veterans at high cardiac risk who undergo major open vascular and general surgery operations is associated with decreased risk of adverse postoperative outcomes compared to a restrictive transfusion strategy (transfusion trigger at Hb < 7 gm/dl).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • The Effect of Loop Diuretics on Severity and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective is to safely determine if the investigators can identify the severity of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) early in the course of the disease. Once enrolled the investigators will draw blood and urine for novel and standard biomarkers. The investigators are attempting to determine if these biomarkers can forecast the course of AKI (need for dialysis, death and renal recovery). The investigators seek to determine how well physicians caring for those with AKI can predict the clinical course compared to these novel biomarkers of AKI and if there is an association between clinical course and 3 year patient outcomes.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Valproic Acid (VPA) for Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) in Liver Transplant Patients

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to find out if a drug called valproic acid (VPA) will protect organs (like the kidneys) from harmful effects caused by the temporary drop and then rise of blood flow and oxygen (called ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury that sometimes happens during liver transplant surgery. VPA is an approved drug for treating conditions such as seizures and migraines for many years. However, it is not approved for use at the higher dose that will be used in this study or for protecting organs from I/R injury. This study will enroll liver transplant patients and randomly assign them to receive either VPA diluted in salt water or salt water without VPA (placebo) and then follow the patients and compare their organ function and overall outcome. This study is masked meaning that the patients, doctors, and nurses will not know which patient received which treatment. The study treatment will be given in addition to the care that liver transplant patients normally receive. The researchers doing this study believe that VPA will lessen organ injury caused by I/R, meaning that patients who receive VPA will experience less kidney injury when compared to patients who receive the placebo.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

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