Skip to main content

Anal Cancer clinical trials at UCSF

7 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With HIV Associated Relapsed or Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma or Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with ipilimumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment, or solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ipilimumab is an antibody that acts against a molecule called cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). CTLA-4 controls a part of your immune system by shutting it down. Nivolumab is a type of antibody that is specific for human programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), a protein that is responsible for destruction of immune cells. Giving ipilimumab with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with HIV associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma or solid tumors compared to ipilimumab with nivolumab alone.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer that are spreading to other places in the body (metastatic). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. This trial is being done to determine if giving radiation therapy to patients who are being treated with immunotherapy and whose cancers are progressing (getting worse) can slow or stop the growth of their cancers. It may also help researchers determine if giving radiation therapy to one tumor can stimulate the immune system to attack other tumors in the body that are not targeted by the radiation therapy.

    San Francisco, California

  • Study of NKTR 255 in Combination With Cetuximab in Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1b/2, open-label multicenter study evaluating NKTR-255 as a monotherapy and together with cetuximab in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), colorectal carcinoma (CRC), cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), anal cell carcinoma (ASCC) and cervical cancer. The recommended phase 2 dose of NKTR-255, determined in the dose escalation phase (Phase 1b), will be used to treat patients in Phase 2 of this study.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Surgery in Treating Patients With Early Stage Anal Canal or Perianal Cancer and HIV Infection

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies surgery in treating patients with anal canal or perianal cancer that is small and has not spread deeply into the tissues and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Local surgery may be a safer treatment with fewer side effects than bigger surgery or radiation and chemotherapy.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Nivolumab After Combined Modality Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Stage II-IIIB Anal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial investigates how well nivolumab after combined modality therapy works in treating patients with high risk stage II-IIIB anal cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Screening Algorithms for Cervical and Anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in People With HIV in Mexico and Puerto Rico

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This clinical trial aims to find what different tests work best to find high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) in the cervix or anus in patients living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with HIV are at high risk of becoming infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) in the cervix or anus where it can turn into cancer over several years. HPV causes changes to the cervix and anus, known as HSIL. This means that there is an area of abnormal tissue on the top layers of the cervix or anus. It is considered cervical or anal cancer if the abnormality spreads down into the layers of tissue below the top. If found early, many cases of HSIL can be treated before turning into cancer. Screening for cervical or anal cancer detection or HSIL associated with HPV may result in earlier treatment, if necessary, for patients living with HIV.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Topical or Ablative Treatment in Preventing Anal Cancer in Patients With HIV and Anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The randomized phase of the trial compared topical or ablative treatment with active monitoring in preventing anal cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Anal HSIL is tissue in the anal canal that has been damaged by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and is at risk for turning into anal cancer. The ANCHOR Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) determined that the primary study endpoint was completed, based on the data and statistical analysis presented to them on 07SEP2021. In the post-randomization phase of this trial, all enrolled participants are offered treatment for HSIL and/or follow-up, at the participant's choice.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Anal Cancer research studies include .

Last updated: