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Brain Tumor clinical trials at UCSF

20 in progress, 5 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • New Way to Treat Children and Young Adults With a Brain Tumor Called NGGCT

    open to eligible people ages 3-29

    This phase II trial studies the best approach to combine chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) based on the patient's response to induction chemotherapy in patients with non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCT) that have not spread to other parts of the brain or body (localized). This study has 2 goals: 1) optimizing radiation for patients who respond well to induction chemotherapy to diminish spinal cord relapses, 2) utilizing higher dose chemotherapy followed by conventional RT in patients who did not respond to induction chemotherapy. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, etoposide, ifosfamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays or high-energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Studies have shown that patients with newly-diagnosed localized NGGCT, whose disease responds well to chemotherapy before receiving radiation therapy, are more likely to be free of the disease for a longer time than are patients for whom the chemotherapy does not efficiently eliminate or reduce the size of the tumor. The purpose of this study is to see how well the tumors respond to induction chemotherapy to decide what treatment to give next. Some patients will be given RT to the spine and a portion of the brain. Others will be given high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant before RT to the whole brain and spine. Giving treatment based on the response to induction chemotherapy may lower the side effects of radiation in some patients and adjust the therapy to a more efficient one for other patients with localized NGGCT.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption (BBBD) for Liquid Biopsy in Subjects With GlioBlastoma Brain Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of targeted blood brain barrier disruption with Exablate Model 4000 Type 2.0/2.1 for liquid biopsy in subjects with suspected Glioblastoma brain tumors

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Intra-Tumoral Injections of Natural Killer Cells for Recurrent Malignant Pediatric Brain Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 1-39

    This phase I trial tests the safety, side effects, and best dose of ex vivo expanded natural killer cells in treating patients with cancerous (malignant) tumors affecting the upper part of the brain (supratentorial) that have come back (recurrent) or that are growing, spreading, or getting worse (progressive). Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that recognize and get rid of abnormal cells in the body, including tumor cells and cells infected by viruses. NK cells have been shown to kill different types of cancer, including brain tumors in laboratory settings. Giving NK cells from unrelated donors who are screened for optimal cell qualities and determined to be safe and healthy may be effective in treating supratentorial malignant brain tumors in children and young adults.

    San Francisco, California

  • RECMAP-study: Resection With or Without Intraoperative Mapping for Recurrent Glioblastoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 90 years

    Resection of glioblastoma in or near functional brain tissue is challenging because of the proximity of important structures to the tumor site. To pursue maximal resection in a safe manner, mapping methods have been developed to test for motor and language function during the operation. Previous evidence suggests that these techniques are beneficial for maximum safe resection in newly diagnosed grade 2-4 astrocytoma, grade 2-3 oligodendroglioma, and recently, glioblastoma. However, their effects in recurrent glioblastoma are still poorly understood. The aim of this study, therefore, is to compare the effects of awake mapping and asleep mapping with no mapping in resections for recurrent glioblastoma. This study is an international, multicenter, prospective 3-arm cohort study of observational nature. Recurrent glioblastoma patients will be operated with mapping or no mapping techniques with a 1:1 ratio. Primary endpoints are: 1) proportion of patients with NIHSS (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale) deterioration at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery and 2) residual tumor volume of the contrast-enhancing and non-contrast-enhancing part as assessed by a neuroradiologist on postoperative contrast MRI scans. Secondary endpoints are: 1) overall survival (OS), 2) progression-free survival (PFS), 4) health-related quality of life (HRQoL) at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery, and 4) frequency and severity of Serious Adverse Events (SAEs) in each arm. Estimated total duration of the study is 5 years. Patient inclusion is 4 years, follow-up is 1 year. The study will be carried out by the centers affiliated with the European and North American Consortium and Registry for Intraoperative Mapping (ENCRAM).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • SUPRAMAX Study: Supramaximal Resection Versus Maximal Resection for High-Grade Glioma Patients (ENCRAM 2201)

    open to eligible people ages 18-90

    A greater extent of resection of the contrast-enhancing (CE) tumor part has been associated with improved outcomes in high-grade glioma patients. Recent results suggest that resection of the non-contrast-enhancing (NCE) part might yield even better survival outcomes (supramaximal resection, SMR). Therefore, this study evaluates the efficacy and safety of SMR with and without mapping techniques in HGG patients in terms of survival, functional, neurological, cognitive, and quality of life outcomes. Furthermore, it evaluates which patients benefit the most from SMR, and how they could be identified preoperatively. This study is an international, multicenter, prospective, 2-arm cohort study of observational nature. Consecutive HGG patients will be operated with supramaximal resection or maximal resection at a 1:3 ratio. Primary endpoints are: 1) overall survival and 2) proportion of patients with NIHSS (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale) deterioration at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Secondary endpoints are 1) residual CE and NCE tumor volume on postoperative T1-contrast and FLAIR MRI scans 2) progression-free survival; 3) onco-functional outcome, and 4) quality of life at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. The study will be carried out by the centers affiliated with the European and North American Consortium and Registry for Intraoperative Mapping (ENCRAM).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Magrolimab in Children and Adults With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Brain Tumors

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Children and adults with recurrent or progressive malignant brain tumors have a dismal prognosis, and outcomes remain very poor. Magrolimab is a first-in-class anticancer therapeutic agent targeting the Cluster of differentiation 47 (CD47)-signal receptor protein-alpha (SIRP-alpha) axis. Binding of magrolimab to human CD47 on target malignant cells blocks the "don't eat me" signal to macrophages and enhances tumor cell phagocytosis. Pre-clinical studies have shown that treatment with magrolimab leads to prolonged survival in models of Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors (ATRT), diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), high-grade glioma (adult and pediatric), medulloblastoma, and embryonal tumors formerly called Primitive Neuro-Ectodermal Tumors (PNET). Safety studies in humans have proven that magrolimab has an excellent safety profile. Ongoing studies are currently testing magrolimab in adult myelodysplastic syndromes, acute myeloid leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, colorectal, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Herein we propose to test the safety of magrolimab in children and adults with recurrent or progressive malignant brain tumors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Phase 1-2 Study of ST101 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This is an open-label, two-part, phase 1-2 dose-finding study designed to determine the safety, tolerability, PK, PD, and proof-of-concept efficacy of ST101 administered IV in patients with advanced solid tumors. The study consists of two phases: a phase 1 dose escalation/regimen exploration phase and a phase 2 expansion phase.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • APL-101 Study of Subjects With NSCLC With c-Met EXON 14 Skip Mutations and c-Met Dysregulation Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    To assess: - efficacy of APL-101 as monotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC harboring MET Exon 14 skipping mutations, NSCLC harboring MET amplification, solid tumors harboring MET amplification, solid tumors harboring MET fusion, primary CNS tumors harboring MET alterations, solid tumors harboring wild-type MET with overexpression of HGF and MET - efficacy of APL-101 as an add-on therapy to EGFR inhibitor for the treatment of NSCLC harboring EGFR activating mutations and developed acquired resistance with MET amplification and disease progression after documented CR or PR with 1st line EGFR inhibitors (EGFR-I)

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Behavioral Health Evaluation and Intervention Program for Patients Undergoing Craniotomy

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a single center non-randomized, single-arm feasibility trial of the implementation of virtual behavioral health counseling sessions alongside standard-of-care treatment.

    San Francisco, California

  • Clinical Benefit of Using Molecular Profiling to Determine an Individualized Treatment Plan for Patients With High Grade Glioma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a 2 strata pilot trial within the Pacific Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Consortium (PNOC). The study will use a new treatment approach based on each patient's tumor gene expression, whole-exome sequencing (WES), targeted panel profile (UCSF 500 gene panel), and RNA-Seq. The current study will test the efficacy of such an approach in children with High-grade gliomas HGG.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Fimepinostat in Treating Brain Tumors in Children and Young Adults

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This trial studies how well fimepinostat works in treating patients with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or medulloblastoma, or high-grade glioma that have come back. Fimepinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Functional Organization of the Superior Temporal Gyrus for Speech Perception

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The basic mechanisms underlying comprehension of spoken language are still largely unknown. Over the past decade, the study team has gained new insights to how the human brain extracts the most fundamental linguistic elements (consonants and vowels) from a complex and highly variable acoustic signal. However, the next set of questions await pertaining to the sequencing of those auditory elements and how they are integrated with other features, such as, the amplitude envelope of speech. Further investigation of the cortical representation of speech sounds can likely shed light on these fundamental questions. Previous research has implicated the superior temporal cortex in the processing of speech sounds, but little is known about how these sounds are linked together into the perceptual experience of words and continuous speech. The overall goal is to determine how the brain extracts linguistic elements from a complex acoustic speech signal towards better understanding and remediating human language disorders.

    San Francisco, California

  • HKI-272 for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this research study is to determine how well neratinib works in treating breast cancer that has spread to the brain. Neratinib is a recently discovered oral drug that may stop breast cancer cells from growing abnormally by inhibiting (or blocking) members of a family of proteins that include Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2). In this research study, the investigators are looking to see how well neratinib works to decrease the size of or stabilize breast cancer that has spread to the brain. The investigators are also looking at how previous treatments have affected your thinking (or cognition) and how much neratinib reaches the central nervous system.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • LUMINOS-101: Lerapolturev (PVSRIPO) and Pembrolizumab in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Phase 2 single arm trial in patients with rGBM will characterize the efficacy, safety, tolerability and initial efficacy of lerapolturev intratumoral infusion followed by intravenous pembrolizumab 14 to 28 days later, and every 3 weeks, thereafter.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Selinexor in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or High-Grade Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor in treating younger patients with solid tumors or central nervous system (CNS) tumors that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as selinexor, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Neural Coding of Speech Across Human Languages

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The overall goal of this study is to reveal the fundamental neural mechanisms that underlie comprehension across human spoken languages. An understanding of how speech is coded in the brain has significant implications for the development of new diagnostic and rehabilitative strategies for language disorders (e.g. aphasia, dyslexia, autism, et alia). The basic mechanisms underlying comprehension of spoken language are unknown. Researchers are only beginning to understand how the human brain extracts the most fundamental linguistic elements (consonants and vowels) from a complex and highly variable acoustic signal. Traditional theories have posited a 'universal' phonetic inventory shared by all humans, but this has been challenged by other newer theories that each language has its own unique and specialized code. An investigation of the cortical representation of speech sounds across languages can likely shed light on this fundamental question. Previous research has implicated the superior temporal cortex in the processing of speech sounds. Most of this work has been entirely carried out in English. The recording of neural activity directly from the cortical surface from individuals with different language experience is a promising approach since it can provide both high spatial and temporal resolution. This study will examine the mechanisms of phonetic encoding, by utilizing neurophysiological recordings obtained during neurosurgical procedures. High-density electrode arrays, advanced signal processing, and direct electrocortical stimulation will be utilized to unravel both local and population encoding of speech sounds in the lateral temporal cortex. This study will also examine the neural encoding of speech in patients who are monolingual and bilingual in Mandarin, Spanish, and English, the most common spoken languages worldwide, and feature important contrastive differences of pitch, formant, and temporal envelope. A cross-linguistic approach is critical for a true understanding of language, while also striving to achieve a broader approach of diversity and inclusion in neuroscience of language.

    San Francisco, California

  • CUDC-907 in Children and Young Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, or Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study is evaluating a novel drug called CUDC-907 as a possible treatment for resistant (refractory) pediatric solid tumors (including neuroblastoma), lymphoma, or brain tumors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Vemurafenib in Children With Recurrent/Refractory BRAF Gene V600E (BRAFV600E)-Mutant Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a multicenter, safety and pharmacokinetic trial to determine the MTD and/or select a recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of vemurafenib in children with recurrent or refractory gliomas containing the BRAFV600E or BRAF Ins T mutation.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Vorinostat and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Malignant Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of vorinostat when given together with temozolomide in treating patients with malignant gliomas. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vorinostat and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Vorinostat may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Vorinostat may help temozolomide work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Giving vorinostat together with temozolomide may kill more tumor cells.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Brain Tumor research studies include .

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