Skip to main content

Down Syndrome clinical trials at UCSF
5 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

  • A Study to Determine the Outcomes of Patients With Localized B Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (B-LLy) When Treated With Standard Risk B-ALL Therapy

    open to eligible people ages up to 31 years

    This phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, standard risk B-lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma with or without Down syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, pegaspargase, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and thioguanine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin decreases the toxic effects of methotrexate. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better then combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with B-ALL. This trial also assigns patients into different chemotherapy treatment regimens based on risk (the chance of cancer returning after treatment). Treating patients with chemotherapy based on risk may help doctors decide which patients can best benefit from which chemotherapy treatment regimens.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients With Down Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages up to 3 years

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of different combinations of risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens and how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma that is found only in the tissue or organ where it began (localized). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), giving the drugs in different doses, and giving the drugs in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • SNP-based Microdeletion and Aneuploidy RegisTry (SMART)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This multi-center prospective observational study is designed to track birth outcomes and perinatal correlates to the Panorama prenatal screening test in the general population among ten thousand women who present clinically and elect Panorama microdeletion and aneuploidy screening as part of their routine care. The primary objective is to evaluate the performance of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-based Non Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) for 22q11.2 microdeletion (DiGeorge syndrome) in this large cohort of pregnant women. This will be done by performing a review of perinatal medical records and obtaining biospecimens after birth to perform genetic diagnostic testing for 22q11.2 deletion. Results from the follow-up specimens will be compared to those obtained by the Panorama screening test to determine test performance. Specific test performance parameters will include: PPV, specificity, and sensitivity.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study of Blood Samples From Newborns With Down Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study is looking at blood samples from newborns with Down syndrome. Studying the genes expressed in samples of blood from patients with Down syndrome may help doctors identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    Oakland, California and other locations

Last updated: