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Hepatitis C clinical trials at UCSF

6 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

Hepatitis C is a disease that affects the liver. At UCSF, we are conducting clinical trials to test different strategies for treating people with Hep C. Some trials are testing how to best deliver treatment to people who also use drugs and are receiving outpatient care, while others are investigating ways to prevent kidney injury after liver transplantation, and studying risk factors for decompensation in people with liver cirrhosis.

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  • Mild Hypothermia and Acute Kidney Injury in Liver Transplantation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), or worsening kidney function, is a common complication after liver transplantation (20-90% in published studies). Patients who experience AKI after liver transplantation have higher mortality, increased graft loss, longer hospital and intensive care unit stays, and more progression to chronic kidney disease compared with those who do not. In this study, half of the participants will have their body temperature cooled to slightly lower than normal (mild hypothermia) for a portion of the liver transplant operation, while the other half will have their body temperature maintained at normal. The study will evaluate if mild hypothermia protects from AKI during liver transplantation.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Rapid HCV Treatment Access for Persons Who Use Drugs

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This study is being done to compare two strategies to deliver HCV treatment to persons with hepatitis C virus (HCV) who also use drugs and are participating in an outpatient opioid treatment program (OTP). Participants will be randomized into one of two treatment groups: 1. Test and treat plus peer-mentors: This treatment group will be offered 8 weeks of glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (an FDA approved HCV treatment) within days of HCV diagnosis at the OTP. Participants in this group will receive treatment adherence support from a peer-mentor who is someone who has been cured of HCV infection. 2. Standard of care HCV treatment referral: This treatment group will be referred to an offsite HCV treatment location. This is the usual care for anyone who tests positive for HCV at the OTP who is not participating in this study.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Liver Cirrhosis Network Cohort Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Liver Cirrhosis Network (LCN) Cohort Study is an observational study designed to identify risk factors and develop prediction models for risk of decompensation in adults with liver cirrhosis. LCN Cohort Study involves multiple institutions and an anticipated 1200 participants. Enrolled participants will have study visits every 6 months (180 days), with opportunities to complete specific visit components via telehealth or remotely. Visits will include collection of questionnaire data and the in-person visits will include questionnaires, physical exams, imaging, and sample collection.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Liver Cirrhosis Network Rosuvastatin Efficacy and Safety for Cirrhosis in the United States

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This is a double-blind, phase 2 study to evaluate safety and efficacy of rosuvastatin in comparison to placebo after 2 years in patients with compensated cirrhosis.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • HCV-TARGET- Hepatitis C Therapeutic Registry and Research Network

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary purpose of the HCV-TARGET study is to establish a nationwide registry of patients undergoing treatment with antiviral therapies for chronic hepatitis C (HCV) at both academic and community practices.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Insulin Resistance in HCV Infection

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study hypothesis is that the means by which HCV induces glucose intolerance is through impairment of B-cell function and compensatory hyperinsulinemia in predisposed Latinos with insulin resistance and that HCV eradication improves these abnormalities. It is also hypothesized that moderate alcohol consumption impact insulin sensitivity and secretion with Latinos with or without HCV infection.

    San Francisco, California

Our lead scientists for Hepatitis C research studies include .

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