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Mantle Cell Lymphoma clinical trials at UCSF

11 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • NX-5948 in Adults With Relapsed/Refractory B-cell Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a first-in-human Phase 1a/1b multicenter, open-label study designed to evaluate the safety and anti-cancer activity of NX-5948 in patients with advanced B-cell malignancies.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Anti-CD19 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will assess safety and feasibility of infusing genetically modified autologous T cells transduced to express a chimeric antigen receptor targeting the B cell surface antigen Cluster of Differentiation 19 (CD19)

    San Francisco, California

  • First-in-Human (FIH) Trial in Patients With Relapsed, Progressive or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The trial is a global, multi-center safety and efficacy trial of epcoritamab, an antibody also known as EPKINLY™ and GEN3013 (DuoBody®-CD3xCD20). The trial consists of 3 parts: - a dose-escalation part (Phase 1, first-in-human (FIH)) - an expansion part (Phase 2a) - a dose-optimization part (Phase 2a)

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Rituximab With or Without Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Minimal Residual Disease-Negative Mantle Cell Lymphoma in First Complete Remission

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This randomized phase III trial studies rituximab after stem cell transplant and to see how well it works compared with rituximab alone in treating patients with in minimal residual disease-negative mantle cell lymphoma in first complete remission. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving rituximab with or without stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • CYT-0851 in B-Cell Malignancies and Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial is an interventional, active-treatment, open-label, multi-center, Phase 1/2 study. The study objectives are to assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of CYT-0851 in patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell malignancies and advanced solid tumors and to identify a recommended Phase 2 dose as a monotherapy and in combination with chemotherapy for evaluation in these patients.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • NX-2127 in Adults With Relapsed/Refractory B-cell Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a first-in-human Phase 1a/1b multicenter, open-label oncology study designed to evaluate the safety and anti-cancer activity of NX-2127 in patients with advanced B-cell malignancies.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Oral LOXO-305 in Patients With Previously Treated CLL/SLL or NHL

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, multi-center Phase 1/2 study of oral LOXO-305 (pirtobrutinib) in patients with CLL/SLL and NHL who have failed or are intolerant to standard of care.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called "anti-HIV genes" are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • JCAR017 in B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (TRANSCEND-NHL-001)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This open-label Phase 1 study will evaluate the safety, PK, and antitumor activity of modified T cells (JCAR017) administered to adult patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell NHL. The dose and schedule of JCAR017 will be evaluated and modified, as needed, for safety and antitumor activity. We will also determine how long the modified T cells stay in the patient's body and how well JCAR017 works in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma whose disease has come back or has not responded to treatment.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Oral LOXO-338 in Patients With Advanced Blood Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to find out whether the study drug, LOXO-338, is safe and effective in patients with advanced blood cancer. Patients must have already received standard therapy. The study may last up to approximately 3 years.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • STRO-001, an Anti-CD74 Antibody Drug Conjugate, in Patients With Advanced B-Cell Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    First-in-human Phase 1 trial to study the safety, pharmacokinetics and preliminary efficacy of STRO-001 given intravenously every 3 weeks.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Mantle Cell Lymphoma research studies include .

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