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Seizures clinical trials at UCSF

10 in progress, 5 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Detecting Absence Seizures Using Eye Tracking

    open to eligible people ages 4-100

    The goal of this study is to develop a comfortable system that uses a wearable eye-tracker similar to eyeglasses to assist people with epilepsy in counting and measuring the severity of seizures. Participants will wear an eye-tracker during a routine EEG.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • EPX-100 (Clemizole Hydrochloride) as Add-on Therapy to Control Convulsive Seizures in Patients With Dravet Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages 2-80

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of EPX-100 against placebo as adjunctive therapy in 60 patients with Dravet Syndrome.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Evaluating the Role of Inflammation in Neonatal Epileptogenesis

    open to all eligible people

    The purpose of this study evaluate the relationship between inflammation and epilepsy in neonates with seizures after birth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Neonatal Seizure Registry - Developmental Functional EValuation

    open to eligible people ages 2-8

    The NSR-DEV study is a longitudinal cohort study of around 280 Neonatal Seizure Registry participants that aims to evaluate childhood outcomes after acute symptomatic neonatal seizures, as well as examine risk factors for developmental disabilities and whether these are modified by parent well-being.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Neonatal Seizure Registry, GEnetics of Post-Neonatal Epilepsy

    open to all eligible people

    The NSR-GENE study is a longitudinal cohort study of approximately 300 parent-child trios from the Neonatal Seizure Registry and participating site outpatient clinics that aims to evaluate whether and how genes alter the risk of post-neonatal epilepsy among children with acute provoked neonatal seizures. The researchers aim to develop prediction rules to stratify neonates into low, medium, and high risk for post-neonatal epilepsy based on clinical, electroencephalogram (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and genetic risk factors.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of ZX008 (Fenfluramine Hydrochloride) as an Adjunctive Therapy in Children and Adults With Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a two-part, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo controlled study to evaluate the effect of ZX008 when used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of uncontrolled seizures in children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study to Investigate the Long-Term Safety of ZX008 (Fenfluramine Hydrochloride) Oral Solution in Children and Adults With Epileptic Encephalopathy Including Dravet Syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is an international, multicenter, open-label, long-term safety study of ZX008 in subjects with Dravet syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or epileptic encephalopathy

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Human Epilepsy Project 2: Resistant Focal Seizures Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The HEP2 study is designed to better understand the challenges of living with focal seizures that do not respond to medication, by following 205 people with medication-resistant focal epilepsy over two years to measure changes in health status, healthcare costs, quality of life, and biomarkers of epilepsy severity and treatment response.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Pediatric Dose Optimization for Seizures in Emergency Medical Services

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The Pediatric Dose Optimization for Seizures in Emergency Medical Services (PediDOSE) study is designed to improve how paramedics treat seizures in children on ambulances. Seizures are one of the most common reasons why people call an ambulance for a child, and paramedics typically administer midazolam to stop the seizure. One-third of children with active seizures on ambulances arrive at emergency departments still seizing. Prior research suggests that seizures on ambulances continue due to under-dosing and delayed delivery of medication. Under-dosing happens when calculation errors occur, and delayed medication delivery occurs due to the time required for dose calculation and placement of an intravenous line to give the medication. Seizures stop quickly when standardized medication doses are given as a muscular injection or a nasal spray. This research has primarily been done in adults, and evidence is needed to determine if this is effective and safe in children. PediDOSE optimizes how paramedics choose the midazolam dose by eliminating calculations and making the dose age-based. This study involves changing the seizure treatment protocols for ambulance services in 20 different cities, in a staggered and randomly-assigned manner. One aim of PediDOSE is to determine if using age to select one of four standardized doses of midazolam and giving it as a muscular injection or nasal spray is more effective than the current calculation-based method, as measured by the number of children arriving at emergency departments still seizing. The investigators believe that a standardized seizure protocol with age-based doses is more effective than current practice. Another aim of PediDOSE is to determine if a standardized seizure protocol with age-based doses is just as safe as current practice, since either ongoing seizures or receiving too much midazolam can interfere with breathing. The investigators believe that a standardized seizure protocol with age-based doses is just as safe as current practice, since the seizures may stop faster and these doses are safely used in children in other healthcare settings. If this study demonstrates that standardized, age-based midazolam dosing is equally safe and more effective in comparison to current practice, the potential impact of this study is a shift in the treatment of pediatric seizures that can be easily implemented in ambulance services across the United States and in other parts of the world.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Roll-over Study to Collect and Assess Long-term Safety of Everolimus in Patients With TSC and Refractory Seizures Who Have Completed the EXIST-3 Study [CRAD001M2304] and Who Are Benefitting From Continued Treatment

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term safety in patients with TSC and refractory seizures who are currently receiving everolimus treatment in the Novartis-sponsored EXIST-3 study and who are determined to be benefiting from continued treatment as judged by the investigator at the completion of EXIST-3

    Oakland, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Seizures medical studies include .

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