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X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency clinical trials at UCSF
3 research studies open to new patients

  • Gene Transfer for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in Newly Diagnosed Infants

    open to eligible males ages up to 24 months

    SCID-X1 is a genetic disorder of blood cells caused by DNA changes in a gene that is required for the normal development of the human immune system. The purpose of this study is to determine if a new method, called lentiviral gene transfer, can be used to treat SCID-X1. This method involves transferring a normal copy of the common gamma chain gene into the participant's bone marrow stem cells. The investigators want to determine if the procedure is safe, whether it can be done according to the methods they have developed, and whether the procedure will provide a normal immune system for the patient. It is hoped that this type of gene transfer may offer a new way to treat children with SCID-X1 that do not have a brother or sister who can be used as a donor for stem cell transplantation.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Natural History Study of SCID Disorders

    open to all eligible people

    This study is a prospective evaluation of children with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) who are treated under a variety of protocols used by participating institutions. In order to determine the patient, recipient and transplant-related variables that are most important in determining outcome, study investigators will uniformly collect pre-, post- and peri-transplant (or other treatment) information on all children enrolled into this study. Children will be divided into three strata: - Stratum A: Typical SCID with virtual absence of autologous T cells and poor T cell function - Stratum B: Atypical SCID (leaky SCID, Omenn syndrome and reticular dysgenesis with limited T cell diversity or number and reduced function), and - Stratum C: ADA deficient SCID and XSCID patients receiving alternative therapy including PEG-ADA ERT or gene therapy. Each Group/Cohort Stratum will be analyzed separately.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Patients Treated for SCID (1968-Present)

    open to all eligible people

    People with Primary Immune Deficiency (PID) may develop severe, life-threatening infections as a result of inherited defects in the genes that normally instruct blood-forming cells to develop and to fight infections. PID diseases include Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID), leaky SCID, Omenn syndrome (OS), and Reticular Dysgenesis (RD). PIDs may be treated by transplantation of bone marrow stem cells from a healthy person or, in some cases, by enzyme replacement or by gene therapy. Patients with SCID were among the first to receive bone marrow stem cell (also called hematopoietic cells) transplantation (HCT) more than 40 years ago, and HCT is the standard treatment today for this group of diseases. Since PID diseases are rare, there are not enough patients at any single center to determine the full range of causes, natural history, or best methods of treatment. For this research study many PID centers across North America have organized into the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) to pool their experience and study PIDs together. Researchers will collect information on your general health, psychological and developmental health, and the current status of your immune system to help better define future approaches to PID treatments.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

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