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Diabetes clinical trials at UCSF
26 in progress, 12 open to new patients

  • A Phase II Trial to Examine the Effect of Subcutaneous Exenatide (Bydureon®) on Glucose Control in Patients With Type I Diabetes

    open to eligible people ages 18–60

    The goal of the proposed pilot study is to determine whether glucose control can be improved with Bydureon treatment in patients with type I diabetes (T1D)

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of SIMPONI® to Arrest Beta-cell Loss in Type 1 Diabetes

    open to eligible people ages 6–21

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine if golimumab can preserve beta-cell function in children and young adults with newly diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes (T1D).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • CTLA4-Ig (Abatacept)for Prevention of Abnormal Glucose Tolerance and Diabetes in Relatives At -Risk for Type 1

    open to eligible people ages 6–45

    The study is a 2-arm, multicenter, 1:1 randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial. All subjects will receive close monitoring for development of AGT or T1DM. Subjects will receive Abatacept or placebo and close monitoring for development of AGT or T1DM. To assess the safety, efficacy, and mode of action of Abatacept to prevent AGT and T1DM. The primary objective is to determine whether intervention with Abatacept will prevent or delay the development of AGT in at-risk autoantibody positive non-diabetic relatives of patients with T1DM. Secondary outcomes include: the effect of Abatacept on the incidence of T1DM; analyses of C-peptide and other measures from the OGTT; safety and tolerability; and mechanistic outcomes.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Delish Study: Diabetes Education to Lower Insulin, Sugars, and Hunger

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the most expensive chronic disease in the U.S. Lifestyle modification is central to T2DM management, but long-term adherence to dietary recommendations is difficult. A key challenge is the difficulty of coping with cravings for high carbohydrate or sugar-laden foods in an environment where these foods are tempting and widely available. One mechanism by which mindfulness may increase long-term dietary adherence is by better equipping individuals with skills to experience food cravings and difficult emotions without eating in response. Such approaches seek to strengthen abilities to be non-judgmentally aware of, tolerate, and respond skillfully to food cravings and difficult emotions without reacting impulsively or maladaptively. The investigators hypothesize that improved ability to manage food cravings and emotional eating is a key mechanism through which mindfulness-enhancements can improve dietary adherence. The study will test a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) for improving dietary adherence. Although the particular diet employed is not the focus of this study, the study will use a diet with about 10% of calories from carbohydrate as: (1) it induces a low level of ketone production, which will be used as a biomarker for dietary adherence; (2) prior studies suggest it improves metabolic parameters in T2DM, including glycemic control.

    San Francisco, California

  • Efficacy and Safety of Finerenone in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and the Clinical Diagnosis of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether oral finerenone (study drug), in addition to standard daily therapy, is effective and safe in treating patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic kidney disease, when compared to a placebo.

    Fresno, California and other locations

  • Inflammation, Diabetes, Ethnicity and Obesity Cohort

    open to eligible people ages 25–65

    Obesity affects over one third of US adults (>72 million, with BMI ≥30 kg/m2), and the proportion of US adults with BMI ≥40 kg/m2 has doubled in the last 20 years. Obesity is associated with increased mortality through its linkage to comorbidities including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea and psychosocial disturbances. Given its prevalence, impact on morbidity and mortality, and economic cost, limiting the spread of obesity and its consequences is one of the most important problems of our time.

    San Francisco, California

  • Pathway to Prevention Study

    open to eligible people ages 1–45

    RATIONALE The accrual of data from the laboratory and from epidemiologic and prevention trials has improved the understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Genetic and immunologic factors play a key role in the development of T1DM, and characterization of the early metabolic abnormalities in T1DM is steadily increasing. However, information regarding the natural history of T1DM remains incomplete. The TrialNet Natural History Study of the Development of T1DM (Pathway to Prevention Study) has been designed to clarify this picture, and in so doing, will contribute to the development and implementation of studies aimed at prevention of and early treatment in T1DM. Purpose: TrialNet is an international network dedicated to the study, prevention, and early treatment of type 1 diabetes. TrialNet sites are located throughout the United States, Canada, Finland, United Kingdom, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Australia, and New Zealand. TrialNet is dedicated to testing new approaches to the prevention of and early intervention for type 1 diabetes. The goal of the TrialNet Natural History Study of the Development of Type 1 Diabetes is to enhance our understanding of the demographic, immunologic, and metabolic characteristics of individuals at risk for developing type 1 diabetes. The Natural History Study will screen relatives of people with type 1 diabetes to identify those at risk for developing the disease. Relatives of people with type 1 diabetes have about a 5% percent chance of being positive for the antibodies associated with diabetes. TrialNet will identify adults and children at risk for developing diabetes by testing for the presence of these antibodies in the blood. A positive antibody test is an early indication that damage to insulin-secreting cells may have begun. If this test is positive, additional testing will be offered to determine the likelihood that a person may develop diabetes. Individuals with antibodies will be offered the opportunity for further testing to determine their risk of developing diabetes over the next 5 years and to receive close monitoring for the development of diabetes.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Safety and Efficacy of CLBS03 in Adolescents With Recent Onset Type 1 Diabetes (The Sanford Project T-Rex Study)

    open to eligible people ages 8–17

    This clinical trial will explore the safety and effect of autologous ex vivo expanded polyclonal regulatory T-cells on beta cell function in patients, aged 8 to 17, with recent onset T1DM. Other measures of diabetes severity and the autoimmune response underlying T1DM will also be explored. Eligible subjects will receive a single infusion of CLBS03 (high or low dose) or placebo.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) Trial is a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial of 1400 patients that will include approximately 60 enrolling sites. The study hypotheses are that treatment of hyperglycemic acute ischemic stroke patients with targeted glucose concentration (80mg/dL - 130 mg/dL) will be safe and result in improved 3 month outcome after stroke. Eligible subjects must be within 12 hours of stroke symptom onset and have diabetes and glucose concentrations of over 110 mg/dL on initial evaluation. The enrolling sites will include the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials (NETT) sites as well as non NETT sites from all over the United States. The study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of targeted glucose control (treatment group - IV insulin with target 80-130 mg/dl) verses control therapy of sub q insulin plus basal insulin with target glucose less than 180 mg/ dL. The primary outcome will be functional outcome at 3 months as measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) Score. The primary safety outcome will be severe hypoglycemia defined as <40 mg/dL. Enrollment will occur over 3.5 - 4 years.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • T1DM Immunotherapy Using Polyclonal Tregs + IL-2

    open to eligible people ages 18–45

    The purpose of this study is to assess the safety of Tregs + IL-2 and survival of Tregs in patients with recent onset T1DM who receive infusions of autologous Tregs + IL-2.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Tocilizumab (TCZ) in New-onset Type 1 Diabetes

    open to eligible people ages 6–17

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease. Based on previous research, study doctors think that giving medicines to affect the immune system soon after diabetes is diagnosed may stop, delay or decrease the destruction of beta cells, resulting in better glucose control. Researchers believe that tocilizumab could have some effect on the cells in the immune system that are thought to be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. This study will test whether tocilizumab can help preserve or delay destruction of remaining beta cells in people recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Type 1 Diabetes Extension Study

    open to eligible people ages 8–35

    To further our understanding of the immunologic mechanisms underlying maintenance and loss of beta cell function by evaluating the relationship between longitudinal changes in beta cell function and changes over time in biomarkers known to be associated with a response to immune modulating treatments which were used in prior clinical trials (Refer to ClinicalTrials.gov records NCT00129259 and NCT00965458).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Administration of Low-dose IL-2 in Established T1D

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Randomized, controlled, double blinded, multicenter, phase I/II clinical trial to evaluate the safety of low-dose IL-2 and to test whether low-dose IL-2 can prevent further loss of beta-cell function in patients with established T1D, or even potentially improve ß-cell function in such individuals, when IL-2 is given for one year (primary outcome). Equally important, the study will carefully examine various effects of low-dose IL-2 on the immune system in patients with T1D, including effects on Treg and other cell subsets, and disease-specific autoimmune responses.

  • Enhancing Self-Management Support in Diabetes Through Patient Engagement

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) and the Chronic Care Model (CCM) are complementary clinical intervention frameworks that are commonly invoked to support better type 2 diabetes (T2DM) outcomes in primary care. Self-management Support (SMS) is a core component of both the PCMH and CCM, and focuses on the central role of patients in managing their illness by engaging with and adopting healthy behaviors that promote optimal clinical outcomes. Despite its recognized importance, SMS programs for diabetes continue to demonstrate limited effectiveness in the real-world of primary care. SMS is comprised of two complementary and interactive components: (1) patient engagement (e.g., the process of eliciting and responding to patients emotions and motivations related to health behaviors), and (2) behavioral change tools (e.g., selecting specific goals, creating action plans). While several sophisticated SMS programs have been developed for T2DM, the vast majority are designed with a narrow focus on behavioral change tools, largely ignoring unique aspects of the patient context that drive and maintain health behavior. Considerable clinical research suggests that the addition of a structured, evidenced-based program of patient engagement can maximize the effectiveness of SMS programs for patients with T2DM in primary care. To date there has been no systematic study of the degree to which fully integrating enhanced patient engagement as part of SMS will increase the initiation and maintenance of behavior change over time, and for which kinds of patients enhanced patient engagement is essential. To address this gap, the investigators will compare a state-of-the-art, evidence-based SMS behavior change tool program, called Connection to Health (CTH), with an enhanced CTH program that includes a practical, time-efficient patient engagement protocol, to create a program with an integrated and comprehensive approach to SMS, called "Enhanced Engagement CTH" (EE-CTH). The current study will directly test the added benefit of EE-CTH to CTH with regard to self-management behaviors and glycemic control in resource-limited community health centers, where vast numbers of patients with T2DM from ethnically diverse and medically vulnerable populations receive their care. The investigators will use an effectiveness-implementation hybrid design, employing the "Reach Effectiveness Adoption Implementation Maintenance" (RE-AIM) framework to test these two SMS programs for T2DM. This will provide critical information that will support dissemination and implementation of effective SMS programs in resource-limited primary care settings, serving diverse and medically vulnerable populations with much to gain from improved SMS.

    San Francisco, California

  • Stepping-down Approach in Patients With Chronic Poorly-controlled Diabetes on Advanced Insulin Therapy?

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    In traditional step-up approach, the patients with poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes are instructed to take up to 4 insulin injections daily or multiple daily injections (MDI) as the most advanced therapy. However, a significant number of these patients continue to have poor diabetes control. The most common reason is the noncompliance with multiple injections and the patient's reluctance to accept insulin-induced weight gain. More recently, the algorithm in diabetes management has significantly changed to accommodate the newer generation of medications. Addition of the diabetes medications, that can induce weight loss such as oral Sodium-glucose Cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors and once-weekly glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists (GLP1 RA) injection, to a basal insulin is now recommended before the patient is advanced to MDI. This approach works very well in most patients since weight loss gives the patients an extra motivation to take medication regularly. Similarly, the patient does not require to take an insulin injection before each meal throughout the day in this approach. Unfortunately, there are still a large number of patients with poor glycemic control who are still on MDI. Some of them were initiated on MDI before the availability of newer generations of medications. Some were started simply because the physician was not aware of or not the familiar with the new recommendations. Regardless of the reason, these patients are likely to remain on MDI despite chronic poor glycemic control since the physicians are understandably reluctant to step down the most advanced insulin therapy. In addition, there has been no data on the benefits and safety of the stepping-down approach from the most advanced insulin therapy to the more patient-friendly approach that is the combined use of oral SGLT2i and once-weekly GLP1 RA injection.

  • Study of Unprecedented Glucose Analysis and Results

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study is a two-arm randomized controlled trial in which participants will receive either the Livongo Health system or iHealth glucose meter for measuring their blood glucose. The study hypothesizes the use of the Livongo Health system results in a greater improvement in A1c compared to standard blood glucose monitoring, as demonstrated by the iHealth Bluetooth-enabled glucose meter.

    San Francisco, California

  • ATG-GCSF in New Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a three-arm, 1:1:1 randomized, placebo controlled, double- blinded trial in which at least 28 subjects will receive active Anti-Thymocyte Globulin and Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (ATG-GCSF), at least 28 subjects will receive ATG alone and at least 28 subjects will receive placebo alone within 100 days from diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). The primary objective of the study will be to determine the safety and ability of low dose ATG plus GCSF and low dose ATG alone to retain/enhance C-peptide production in new onset T1D patients demonstrating residual beta cell function.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • De Novo Lipogenesis, Lipid and Carbohydrate Metabolism in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is paralleled with increased cases of non-alcoholic liver disease (liver fat accumulation) and diabetes. Fat belongs in the adipose tissue, and if excess fat accumulates in the liver or muscle, these tissues cannot use sugar efficiently. It has been discovered that when large quantities of fructose (a sugar present in soft drinks) are consumed, the conversion of carbohydrate (CHO) to fat in the liver increases. We hypothesize that: 1) subjects with fatty liver have a higher CHO uptake and conversion to fat in their liver when compared to matched control subjects with normal liver fat content; and that: 2) when subjects with fatty liver are fed a diet limiting fructose and simple sugars will decrease their liver CHO fat content. This reduction in liver fat will normalize the way the liver responds to sugar and insulin, reversing the pre-diabetic state. The measurement of these parameters will be done using state-of-the-art techniques such as safe non-radioactive isotope tracers and non-invasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy. For more information, please call 415-206-5532 for a phone screening

    Vallejo, California

  • Efficacy of Islet After Kidney Transplantation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are destroyed, resulting in poor blood sugar control. The purpose of this study is to assess the benefit of islet transplantation in type 1 diabetic (T1D) kidney transplant recipients.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Extended Follow-Up After Islet Transplantation in T1D

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to provide patients who have received at least one islet transplant as a previous participant in a Clinical Islet Transplantation Consortium (CIT) clinical trial with maintenance immunosuppressive medications and to collect information about the safety of the medications and islet function.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Feeding America Intervention Trial for Health--Diabetes Mellitus

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The Feeding America Intervention Trial for Health—Diabetes Mellitus (FAITH-DM) is a randomized, controlled study of the implementation of a diabetes intervention in food pantry settings.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Imatinib Treatment in Recent Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing ß cells. Although exogenous insulin is widely available, it is not possible for affected individuals to consistently achieve euglycemia with current technology, and thus they are at risk for devastating long-term complications. This phase II study is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of imatinib mesylate as a novel therapy for new-onset T1DM. Imatinib is a first-in-class tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study will explore the potential role of short-term therapy with imatinib to induce tolerance and possibly lead to a durable long-term remission of T1DM.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Immune Effects of Oral Insulin in Relatives at Risk for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (TN20)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study is a 2 arm, multi-center, randomized, open-labeled clinical trial designed to assess the effects of varying doses and schedules of oral insulin on immunological and metabolic markers in relatives at risk for type 1 diabetes (T1D).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Reversing Type 1 Diabetes After it is Established

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine if giving the combination therapy consisting of Thymoglobulin® (ATG) and Neulasta® (GCSF) to patients with established Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is safe and secondarily, if the ATG and GCSF will preserve insulin production.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Teplizumab for Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes In Relatives "At-Risk"

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study will determine whether the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, teplizumab, can help to prevent or delay the onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in relatives determined to be at very high risk for developing the disease. Teplizumab has been studied in new onset type 1 diabetes for testing of efficacy and safety in previous studies; other studies are currently in progress. The results of previous studies indicate that teplizumab reduces the loss of insulin production during the first year after diagnosis in individuals with type 1 diabetes. The purpose of this study is to determine if teplizumab can interdict the immune process that causes the destruction of insulin secreting beta cells in the pancreas during the "pre-diabetic" state and thereby prevent or delay the onset of type 1 diabetes.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Treatment of Type I Diabetes by Islet Transplantation Into the Gastric Submucosa Study Protocol

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of this trial is to gain initial clinical experience regarding the safety and efficacy of treating type I diabetes in people who have received a kidney transplant by transplanting islets into a new transplant site in the stomach (gastrointestinal submucosa). A total of 6 patients will be enrolled in the study and followed for a period of up to 3 years after the last islet transplant.

    San Francisco, California