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Amyotropic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) clinical trials at UCSF
3 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

  • Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (ARTFL)

    open to eligible people ages 18-85

    Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) is the neuropathological term for a collection of rare neurodegenerative diseases that correspond to four main overlapping clinical syndromes: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), corticobasal degeneration syndrome (CBS) and progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSPS). The goal of this study is to build a FTLD clinical research consortium to support the development of FTLD therapies for new clinical trials. The consortium, referred to as Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (ARTFL), will be headquartered at UCSF and will partner with six patient advocacy groups to manage the consortium. Participants will be evaluated at 14 clinical sites throughout North America and a genetics core will genotype all individuals for FTLD associated genes.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • ECoG BMI for Motor and Speech Control

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Test the feasibility of using electrocorticography (ECoG) signals to control complex devices for motor and speech control in adults severely affected by neurological disorders.

    San Francisco, California

  • Study of Acthar® Gel (Acthar) for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    About 213 people with ALS will participate in this study. There will be locations in North and South America. During the first part, participants will be randomly assigned to a group (like by flipping a coin). Out of every 3: - 2 will get the study drug - 1 will get a look-alike with no drug in it (placebo) During the second part, everyone will get the study drug. Participation will help doctors find out if Acthar can help or slow down the symptoms of ALS better than placebo.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

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