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Myelodysplastic Syndrome clinical trials at UCSF

15 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study to Evaluate Long-term Safety in Participants Who Have Participated in Other Luspatercept (ACE-536) Clinical Trials

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 3b, open-label, single-arm, rollover study to evaluate the long-term safety of luspatercept, to the following participants: - Participants receiving luspatercept on a parent protocol at the time of their transition to the rollover study, who tolerate the protocol-prescribed regimen in the parent trial and, in the opinion of the investigator, may derive clinical benefit from continuing treatment with luspatercept - Participants in the follow-up phase previously treated with luspatercept or placebo in the parent protocol will continue into long-term post-treatment follow-up in the rollover study until the follow-up commitments are met - The study design is divided into the Transition Phase, Treatment Phase and Follow-up Phase. Participants will enter transition phase and depending on their background will enter either the treatment phase or the Long-term Post-treatment Follow-up (LTPTFU) phase - Transition Phase is defined as one Enrollment visit - Treatment Phase: For participants in luspatercept treatment the dose and schedule of luspatercept in this study will be the same as the last dose and schedule in the parent luspatercept study. This does not apply to participants that are in long-term follow-up from the parent protocol - Follow-up Phase includes: - 42 Day Safety Follow-up Visit - During the Safety Follow up, the participants will be followed for 42 days after the last dose of luspatercept, for the assessment of safety-related parameters and adverse event (AE) reporting - Long-term Post-treatment Follow-up (LTPTFU) Phase - Participants will be followed for overall survival every 6 months for at least 5 years from first dose of luspatercept in the parent protocol, or 3 years of post-treatment from last dose, whichever occurs later, or until death, withdrawal of consent, study termination, or until a subject is lost to follow-up. Participants will also be monitored for progression to AML or any malignancies/pre-malignancies. New anticancer or disease related therapies should be collected at the same time schedule Participants transitioning from a parent luspatercept study in post-treatment follow-up (safety or LTPTFU) will continue from the same equivalent point in this rollover study. The rollover study will be terminated, and relevant participants will discontinue from the study when all participants fulfill at least 5 years from the first dose of luspatercept in the parent protocol, or 3 years of post-treatment from last dose, whichever occurs later.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • CPX-351 and Glasdegib for Newly Diagnosed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia With MDS Related Changes or Therapy-related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 2 single-arm, open-label clinical trial determining efficacy of CPX-351 in combination with Glasdegib in subjects with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with myelodysplastic syndrome related changes or therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of PRT543 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors and Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1 cohort, dose-escalation, dose-expansion study of PRT543 in patients with advanced cancers who have exhausted available treatment options. The purpose of this study is to define a safe dose and schedule to be used in subsequent development of PRT543.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Cord Blood Transplant With OTS for the Treatment of HIV Positive Hematologic Cancers

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of a cord blood transplant using OTS and to see how well it works in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive hematologic (blood) cancers. After a cord blood transplant, the immune cells, including white blood cells, can take a while to recover, putting the patient at increased risk of infection. OTS consists of blood stem cells that help to produce mature blood cells, including immune cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total body irradiation is a type of whole-body radiation. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a cord blood transplant with OTS may help to kill any cancer cells that are in the body and make room in the patient's bone marrow for new stem cells to grow and reduce the risk of infection.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Ibrutinib and Azacitidine for Treatment of Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of ibrutinib when given together with azacitidine in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to occur or spread (higher risk) and who were previously treated or untreated and unfit for or refused intense therapy. Ibrutinib and azacitidine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • KIR Favorable Mismatched Haplo Transplant and KIR Polymorphism in ALL/AML/MDS Allo-HCT Children

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a phase II, open-label, non-randomized, prospective study of haploidentical transplantation using KIR-favorable donors for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The relationship of KIR2DL1 polymorphisms to survival in children with these diseases undergoing any approach to allogeneic HCT during the study time frame will also be determined.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Matched Targeted Therapy For High-Risk Leukemias and MDS

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study is seeking to gain new knowledge about Recurrent, Refractory, or High Risk Leukemias in children and young adults. This study is evaluating the use of specialized testing called leukemia profiling. Once the profiling is performed, the results are evaluated by an expert panel of physicians, scientists and pharmacists. This may result in a recommendation for a specific cancer therapy or a clinical trial called matched targeted therapy (MTT). The results of the leukemia profiling and, if applicable, the MTT recommendation will be communicated to the participant's primary oncologist.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Pevonedistat, Azacitidine, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well pevonedistat, azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Pevonedistat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and pevonedistat may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients With Down Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Study of APVO436 in Patients With AML or MDS

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The primary objective of the Phase 1 part of the study is to determine the recommended dose of APVO436 administered intravenously to patients with AML or MDS. The primary objective of the Phase 1b part of the study is to evaluate the clinical activity of APVO436 in patients with AML or MDS. APVO436 is being studied in this Phase 1b, open-label, multi-center, two-part dose-escalation/dose expansion study to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD), and clinical activity of APVO436 in patients with AML and MDS. The study will be conducted in 2 parts. The first part of this Phase 1B study is an open-label, multiple dose ascending dose escalation phase to determine the recommended dose (RP2D) level of APVO436 for future Phase 2 studies. The goal of the dose expansion phase of the study (Part 2) is to (i) evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care and (ii) obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities. Study Objectives for Dose Escalation Phase - Primary Objectives are to: 1. Determine the RP2D level of APVO436 administered intravenously (IV) in patients with AML or MDS, and 2. Evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care and obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities. - Secondary Objectives are to: 1. Define the safety profile and immunogenicity of APVO436; to determine the PK/PD of APVO436; to evaluate the clinical activity of APVO436 in AML and MDS patients. 2. Further evaluate the safety profile and immunogenicity of APVO436 and the PK/PD of APVO436 and the relationship between PK/PD and clinical response. Study Objectives for Dose Expansion Phase - Primary Objective is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care. - Secondary Objective is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • TAC/MTX vs. TAC/MMF/PTCY for Prevention of Graft-versus-Host Disease and Microbiome and Immune Reconstitution Study (BMT CTN 1703/1801)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    1703: The study is designed as a randomized, phase III, multicenter trial comparing two acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) prophylaxis regimens: tacrolimus/methotrexate (Tac/MTX) versus post-transplant cyclophosphamide/tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil (PTCy/Tac/MMF) in the setting of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation. 1801: The goal of this protocol is to test the primary hypothesis that the engraftment stool microbiome diversity predicts one-year non-relapse mortality in patients undergoing reduced intensity allogeneic HCT.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Tagraxofusp in Pediatric Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD123 Expressing Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Tagraxofusp is a protein-drug conjugate consisting of a diphtheria toxin redirected to target CD123 has been approved for treatment in pediatric and adult patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN). This trial aims to examine the safety of this novel agent in pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory hematologic malignancies. The mechanism by which tagraxofusp kills cells is distinct from that of conventional chemotherapy. Tagraxofusp directly targets CD123 that is present on tumor cells, but is expressed at lower or levels or absent on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Tagraxofusp also utilizes a payload that is not cell cycle dependent, making it effective against both highly proliferative tumor cells and also quiescent tumor cells. The rationale for clinical development of tagraxofusp for pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies is based on the ubiquitous and high expression of CD123 on many of these diseases, as well as the highly potent preclinical activity and robust clinical responsiveness in adults observed to date. This trial includes two parts: a monotherapy phase and a combination chemotherapy phase. This design will provide further monotherapy safety data and confirm the FDA approved pediatric dose, as well as provide safety data when combined with chemotherapy. The goal of this study is to improve survival rates in children and young adults with relapsed hematological malignancies, determine the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of tagraxofusp given alone and in combination with chemotherapy, as well as to describe the toxicities, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic properties of tagraxofusp in pediatric patients. About 54 children and young adults will participate in this study. Patients with Down syndrome will be included in part 1 of the study.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Collecting and Storing Blood, Bone Marrow, and Other Samples From Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    As one of the nation's largest cooperative cancer treatment groups, the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (Alliance) is in a unique position to organize a Leukemia Tissue Bank. The member institutions diagnose hundreds of patients with leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome each year, and uniformly treat these patients with chemotherapy regimens. The Alliance offers centralized data management for the clinical history, the classification of the leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, cytogenetics, flow cytometric analysis, treatment and follow-up. The highly skilled health care providers at each member institution are familiar with obtaining informed consent, completing data questionnaires and shipping specimens. There currently exists a central processing facility where samples are prepared for a variety of cellular and molecular studies. Hence, the patient resources, the health care providers, and a processing facility for a Leukemia Tissue Bank are all in place. What is needed, however, and is addressed in the current protocol, is a formal mechanism to procure bone marrow, blood and normal tissue from patients with hematologic malignancies who are to be enrolled on Alliance (Cancer and Leukemia Group B [CALGB]) treatment studies.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Cytogenetic Studies in Acute Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Chromosomal analysis or the study of genetic differences in patients previously untreated with AML, ALL, MDS or MM may be helpful in the diagnosis and classification of disease. It may also improve the ability to predict the course of disease and the selection of therapy. Institutions must have either an Alliance-approved cytogeneticist or an agreement from an Alliance-approved main member cytogenetics laboratory to enroll a patient on CALGB 8461. The Alliance Approved Institutional Cytogeneticists list is posted on the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology website.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Natural History and Biology of Long-Term Late Effects Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Childhood Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective non-therapeutic study, assessing the long-term toxicity of pediatric HCT for hematologic malignancies. This study is a collaboration between the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC), the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), the National Marrow Transplant Program (NMDP) and the Resource for Clinical Investigation in Blood and Marrow Transplantation (RCI-BMT) of the CIBMTR. The study will enroll pediatric patients who undergo myeloablative HCT for hematologic malignancies at PBMTC sites.

    Oakland, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Myelodysplastic Syndrome research studies include .

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