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Obesity clinical trials at UCSF
16 in progress, 10 open to new patients

  • Biology and Experience of Eating

    open to eligible females ages 18–45

    The purpose of this study is to understand how the opioid system is involved in eating behavior.

    San Francisco, California

  • Dietary Treatment Study of Fat Synthesis and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

    open to eligible people ages 20–65

    The purpose of this study is to find out how the amount of fat or sugar in a person's diet, or the number of meals eaten each day, affect the amount of fat that people's bodies make, the types of fats in the bloodstream, and how much fat is stored in the liver. The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health.

    San Francisco, California

  • Effects of Sleeve Gastrectomy on Calcium Metabolism and the Skeleton

    open to eligible people ages 25–70

    In this pre-post observational study, the investigators will enroll and follow a cohort of about 50 adults undergoing sleeve gastrectomy surgery for weight loss. Pre-operatively and at 6 and 12 months post-operatively, the investigators will use state-of-the-art metabolic and imaging techniques to evaluate calcium metabolism and skeletal health. Specific outcomes include intestinal calcium absorption capacity, bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and bone structure assessed by QCT and high-resolution peripheral QCT (HR-pQCT).

    San Francisco, California

  • Endoscopic Gastric Plication for Weight Loss in Morbidly Obese Patients Prior to Incisional Hernia Repair

    open to eligible people ages 18–70

    Incisional hernias occur in nearly 20% of all laparotomy incisions accounting for almost 400,000 ventral hernia repairs annually in the United States. There is an even higher incidence of incisional hernia recurrence after prior repair if the patient is obese. Each subsequent hernia repair leads to increased morbidity and durability. It is not infrequent that many surgeons will advise overweight or obese patients to lose substantial weight prior to complex incisional hernia repair. However, it is quite difficult for any individual to lose more than 8 pounds a month in a safe, rapid, and sustainable fashion. This is based on losing 2 lbs. per week utilizing diet and exercise alone. Many patients with incisional hernia are physically debilitated that they cannot engage in any substantial physical activity to lose weight. Traditional laparoscopic bariatric surgery (i.e. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and SG), while feasible, is a technically challenging endeavor since prior abdominal surgeries increase the amount of intra-abdominal adhesions. Furthermore, there is still a subset of patients who are not candidates for laparoscopic weight loss surgery because of inability to tolerate pneumoperitoneum due to underlying physiologic dysfunction. - Novel minimally invasive endoscopic technique may help obese patients with an incisional hernia lose weight in a safe and rapid fashion. Early case reports and small case series on gastric bypass revision utilizing such endoscopic technique have shown promise in efficacious weight loss. There have been reports of achieving nearly 20-25% excess weight loss. Abu Dayyeh and colleagues have also demonstrated that endoscopic gastric plication as a primary weight loss procedure is feasible, but their reported follow-up was only 3 months.8 Brethauer, et al. from Cleveland Clinic performed transoral gastric volume reduction for weight management in 18 patients (TRIM TRIAL). They utilized the Restore Suturing System (Restore device) and reported a mean decrease in BMI of -4.0 ± 3.5 kg/m2. Mean excess weight loss was 27.7% ± 21.9% with no reports of adverse events.9 There have also been reports of not only weight loss but improved insulin sensitivity and secretion.10 Laparoscopic gastric greater curvature plication afforded a mean 50.7% excess weight loss at 12 months.11 The intent of this study is not to demonstrate endoscopic suturing to be a primary option for weight-loss surgery. Preliminary reports have shown such procedure is technically feasible but not durable and the effects of the procedure varied widely among the study participants.12 The investigators view this technology as a bridge for morbidly obese patients, who will need subsequent surgery for another surgical disease, to improve their body habitus and decrease their postoperative morbidity and mortality. The aims of the investigators study are: - Feasibility of endoscopic gastric sleeve plication - Define the technical aspects of endoscopic suturing for sleeve plication - Provide long-term follow-up for both weight loss and resolution of their co-morbidities - Time from the endoscopic procedure to their incisional hernia repair - Photographic evidence of the stomach after endoscopic plication during the incisional hernia repair There are several advantages for the proposed study. First it avoids entering the intra-abdominal cavity. Second, the procedure is performed solely with sutures obviating the need for stapling which may increase the risk of gastric leak from the staple line.13 Lastly, it avoids placing endoscopic intra-luminal devices such as intragastric balloons or duodenal-jejunal sleeves. Limiting factor of such devices is a high rate of premature device withdrawal due to intolerance. Furthermore, their effects are short-lived as most devices will need to be removed by 12 weeks and they only offer a mean 23.6% excess weight loss.13, 14 The implications of this study can be far-reaching. Once efficacy is demonstrated where enough weight loss is achieved that patients can safely and quickly undergo their incisional hernia surgery, the investigators can then conduct a retrospective case-control cross-matched study to further delineate its true benefit. If there is a true benefit, then a randomized control study can be employed in the future.

    San Francisco, California

  • Improving Reproductive Fitness Through Pretreatment With Lifestyle Modification in Obese Women With Unexplained Infertility

    open to eligible females ages 18–40

    A two-arm, multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial of a lifestyle modification program with tracked increased physical activity and weight loss (intensive) compared to recommendations to tracking of increased physical activity alone with weight maintenance (standard) in women with obesity and unexplained infertility. This 16 week period of lifestyle modification will be followed by an open label empiric infertility treatment regimen consisting of three cycles of ovarian stimulation with oral medication (clomiphene citrate (CC)), triggering of ovulation with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and intrauterine insemination (IUI).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Inflammation, Diabetes, Ethnicity and Obesity Cohort

    open to eligible people ages 25–65

    Obesity affects over one third of US adults (>72 million, with BMI ≥30 kg/m2), and the proportion of US adults with BMI ≥40 kg/m2 has doubled in the last 20 years. Obesity is associated with increased mortality through its linkage to comorbidities including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea and psychosocial disturbances. Given its prevalence, impact on morbidity and mortality, and economic cost, limiting the spread of obesity and its consequences is one of the most important problems of our time.

    San Francisco, California

  • INtervention Study In overweiGHT Patients With COPD

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    Symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and high body mass index (BMI) overlap. The investigators are trying to find out if a program proven to help people lose a modest amount of weight and increase their physical activity will improve COPD symptoms for those with a high BMI. The program uses a series of digital video discs (DVD) sessions focused on healthy eating and physical activity, and encourages participants to monitor their weight, diet, and physical activity for two years. For those who want to, they will be able to work with a health coach to help meet weight and activity goals. We hope that the program will lead to weight loss, better exercise tolerance, and less shortness of breath. To be in the study, participants will need to have COPD, high BMI, history of smoking, shortness of breath, and be at least 40 years old.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry (POWER) Study

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    The main objective of this study is to establish a national pediatric obesity registry known as POWER (Pediatric Obesity Weight Evaluation Registry). This registry will contain clinical data from individual comprehensive pediatric weight management programs around the United States for overweight and obese youth.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • PRebiotic to IMprovE Calcium Absorption

    open to eligible females ages 18–75

    Gastric bypass surgery is a highly effective treatment for obesity, but it has negative effects on skeletal health, due in part to a dramatic decline in intestinal calcium absorption capacity. Animal and human studies suggest that non-digestible fibers termed prebiotics, such as soluble corn fiber (SCF), augment calcium absorption in the lower intestine as they act as substrates for beneficial gut microbiota. This is a pilot randomized controlled trial of the effects of SCF vs. placebo on intestinal calcium absorption, bone turnover marker levels, and the gut microbiome in postmenopausal women who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery.

    San Francisco, California

  • School Water Access, Food and Beverage Intake, and Obesity

    open to eligible people ages 9–12

    It is widely argued that the promotion of water consumption, as an alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages, can assist in childhood obesity prevention efforts. Yet no studies have tested this argument in real world schools where flavored milk or juices are available. This trial will fill gaps by examining how promoting fresh water intake-both in schools that do and do not provide access to caloric beverages -impacts children's consumption of food and beverages both during and outside of school, and obesity.

    San Francisco, California

  • Strong Futures: A Trial of Two Primary Care Based Interventions to Promote Optimal Health in Latino Infants and Toddlers

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Latino children experience higher rates of obesity compared to non-Hispanic white children, especially in low-income communities. Optimal feeding strategies in early life, avoidance of screen time and longer sleep duration may lower the risk of obesity. Family financial hardship is also associated with short- and long-term health risks, including behavioral and mental health problems, and toxic stress which contributes to elevated risk of common chronic conditions over the life course. This proposal aims to pilot test two interventions to promote optimal health outcomes in Latino infants. Study participants will meet with a health educator after well child visits at 2-weeks, 2-, 4-, 6-, 9- and 12-months. Half of the parents will receive education on obesity prevention. The other half will receive financial education and case management using an established financial coaching approach. Parents will also receive text messages that reinforce educational content. The objective of this study is to determine the acceptability and feasibility of offering these interventions in the well-child setting. Study investigators also seek to determine the preliminary efficacy of these interventions on infant and parent health outcomes including dietary intake, screen time, sleep duration, health related quality of life and financial stress.

    San Francisco, California

  • Study of Time-restricted Eating on Weight Loss.

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a randomized controlled trial studying the effects of time-restricted feeding (TRF) on weight loss in obese humans. Obesity is the number one risk factor for type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), and numerous studies demonstrate that weight loss is an effective strategy to prevent T2DM and improve the metabolic health of people diagnosed with T2DM. Unfortunately, classical calorie restriction diets often fail to produce long-term weight loss due to low compliance, reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR), and other factors. Therefore, novel dieting techniques must be explored in order to successfully treat obesity and prevent T2DM. Studies in mice provide compelling evidence that feeding/fasting cycles can be altered to produce beneficial effects on weight loss and metabolic health markers in the absence of calorie restriction. Limited research in human subjects suggests that this feeding paradigm may translate to human health as well, however, more research needs to be done in order to confirm this hypothesis. This study will determine if TRE can lead to weight loss in obese human subjects. Secondary outcomes include changes in body composition, HOMA-IR, hormonal and biochemical serum markers, RMR, and total energy expenditure (TEE).

  • Walnuts to Achieve Lasting NUTrition to Prevent Diabetes

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Prediabetes is a precursor of type 2 diabetes and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and currently affects one-quarter of the population of the United States. Individuals of overweight or obese BMI are at particular high risk for incident diabetes. A major modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes is poor dietary quality, and improvement of dietary quality can effectively delay and even prevent type 2 diabetes. Interventions to improve dietary quality thus far, however, rely on short-term intensive clinically designed meals replacing the entire diet which have poor sustainability. Persistent improvements to daily dietary patterns are often difficult without directed guidance, and overall dietary quality in the United States remains poor. The identification of a practical, daily dietary intervention to improve dietary quality and prevent diabetes in those at high risk remains unknown. We propose to enroll 40 individuals with diagnosed prediabetes into a randomized controlled pilot study and provide a daily walnut supplementation intervention to determine feasibility and acceptability of the supplement. We will then determine preliminary efficacy on metabolic markers and will investigate associations between dietary quality and circulating levels of branched-chain amino acids. Our goal is to implement a whole-food supplement to improve dietary quality in patients with prediabetes as a tool for future type 2 diabetes prevention.

    San Francisco, California

  • Fit and Trim for Diabetes Prevention

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Filipino Americans (FA) are the second largest (3.4 million) Asian group in the US. and have one of the highest prevalences of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to non-Hispanic whites, African Americans and Hispanics. However, FA have been underrepresented in health related research, particularly in diabetes prevention. This proposed pilot study is the first clinical trial to assess preliminary estimates of the short-term effect of the novel social networking diabetes prevention program lifestyle intervention for this high-risk population.

    San Francisco, California

  • GERD Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) creates a vertical gastrectomy which results in a narrow and tubular shape of stomach. The line of resection starts at 3-6 cm. from pylorus (antrum) toward to the angle of His. The gastric antrum plays a major role in gastric emptying, particularly for solids. Hence, depending upon the starting point of gastric sleeve resection in each center, this can result in difference of the remaining gastric antrum which may affect gastric emptying time after this procedure.

  • Pelvic Radiation Therapy or Vaginal Implant Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Stage I or Stage II Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies pelvic radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with vaginal implant radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin in treating patients with high-risk stage I or stage II endometrial cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Implant radiation therapy uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether pelvic radiation therapy alone is more effective than vaginal implant radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin in treating patients with endometrial cancer.

    San Francisco, California and other locations