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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder clinical trials at UCSF

12 in progress, 8 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Doxazosin for Nightmares, Sleep Disturbance, and Non-Nightmare Clinical Symptoms in PTSD

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of doxazosin will assess doxazosin's effectiveness for PTSD nightmares, subjective sleep quality, and non-nightmare PTSD symptoms in adult men and women veterans with full and partial-syndromal PTSD.

    San Francisco, California

  • Apnea and Insomnia Relief Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a behavioral sleep treatment improves functioning and sleep in Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    San Francisco, California

  • BLOOM: Boldly Living outdOOrs for Mental Health

    open to eligible people ages 9-12

    In 2019, the Office of the California Surgeon General launched the ACEs Aware Initiative in collaboration with the California Department of Health Care Services. This ambitious campaign aims to develop a network of care model of healthcare delivery that explicitly links health resources within communities to clinicians screening patients for ACEs. The ACEs Aware Initiative recognizes nature experiences as one of seven "stress busters." Indeed, California boasts many outdoor resources for clinicians to integrate into the network of care. Through a calming effect on the autonomic nervous system, providing a setting for supportive relationships to develop and physical activity to occur, time in nature may help California prevent, heal and treat ACEs and the clinical sequelae. As one of the most common psychiatric disorders in youth, anxiety remains one of the most important sequelae of ACEs. There is a gap in evidence evaluating nature-based programs for child mental health. This study will evaluate BLOOM [Boldly Living outdOOrs for Mental health], a new intervention which is a modified version of an existing nature-based curriculum called SHINE (Stay Healthy In Nature Everyday) curriculum currently in place at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, which takes youth and their families into nature once a month for stress relief. This new intervention mirrors SHINE except that it will be tailored to children ages 9-12 with a history of ACEs and current anxiety. This study will evaluate the benefits of a group intervention model, an independent nature-outing model, and a comparison to a wait-listed control group. Our goal is to provide a scalable model for low-cost mental health care to the California Department of Health Care Services.

    Oakland, California

  • Brief Behavioral Treatment for Insomnia in Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This study will investigate treatments for insomnia in Veterans who have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The purpose of this study is to compare a brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTI) to a treatment that helps promote relaxation (progressive muscle relaxation training or PMRT). The investigators will examine improvements in psychosocial functioning and insomnia severity. The investigators will also examine whether treatment gains last over time and whether suicidal ideation decreases following insomnia treatment.

    San Francisco, California

  • Oxytocin to Treat PTSD

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic, debilitating condition that disproportionately affects Veterans. Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy is a "gold standard" treatment for PTSD. However, approximately one-third of Veterans fail to receive an adequate dose of treatment because they prematurely drop out of PE therapy. There is also room to improve PE treatment outcomes. Consistent with the VA Office of Research and Development initiative to develop effective treatments for PTSD, the proposed randomized clinical trial will examine the ability of oxytocin (as compared with placebo) combined with PE to reduce PTSD symptom severity, improve the rate of PTSD symptom reduction, and to enhance PE treatment retention and adherence. This two-site study will leverage the investments made in the nationwide rollout off PE therapy and has the potential to significantly improve mental health care among Veterans, advance the science in this area, and identify mechanisms underlying positive PTSD treatment response. Participants may choose to complete this research study via home-based telemedicine (HBT) care (i.e. service delivery to patients in their homes using consumer friendly, video-conferencing technology). HBT sessions will be delivered via standard desk, laptop computer, tablet, or smartphone using VA approved applications. All procedures that take place via telemedicine will be performed and completed as though they were in-person/in-office

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist in the Treatment of Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    open to eligible people ages 18-69

    There is large body of evidence demonstrating that Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is associated with alterations in the stress hormone cortisol. There is also evidence that medications that block cortisol may be beneficial for treating PTSD and depression. The VA recently completed a study of a mifepristone, a medication that blocks cortisol and progesterone hormones, and found some benefit for Veterans who did not have a history of traumatic brain injury. The proposal will test a medication from a new class of cortisol blockers which have no effect on progesterone. The proposed study will test the drug CORT108297 for treatment of PTSD and will establish a safety profile that will inform the design of future studies.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Modification of Attention Bias Remotely After Trauma

    open to eligible people ages 18-55

    The investigators will complete an entirely remote randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing 14 sessions of attention bias modification (ABM), attention control training (ACT), placebo neutral attention training, and a final control condition with daily questions in 1,897 individuals with clinically significant Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms (PTSS) (defined as PCL-5 score ≥ 33). To assess effects of the training and control conditions, the investigators will administer tests of threat-related attention bias and variability, and self-report assessments of PTSS, depression, anxiety, and perceived stress at baseline, after one and two weeks of training, and at eight-week follow up. The investigators plan to screen and confirm interest from over 3,000 eligible participants over a period of 24 months to enroll and randomize 1,897 participants with the end goal of 1,232 completers (176 per condition).

    San Francisco, California

  • Suvorexant: A Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist for Treating Sleep Disturbance in Posttraumatic Stress

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common consequence of combat that can result in trauma-related hyperarousal and sleep disturbances. Poor sleep, one of the most common complaints in Veterans with PTSD, can be distressing, impair concentration and memory, and contribute to physical health conditions, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. The orexin neuropeptide system underlies both sleep and stress reactivity. Suvorexant, a drug that reduces orexin, improves sleep in civilians, but has not yet been tested in Veterans with PTSD. This study will test whether suvorexant can improve sleep disturbances and PTSD symptoms in Veterans. Suvorexant may benefit Veterans by improving sleep quickly while also reducing PTSD symptoms over the long term, and with fewer side effects that were common in previous medications used to treat these conditions. Improving Veterans' sleep and PTSD symptoms could lead to better emotional and physical well-being, quality of life, relationships, and functioning.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Novel Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Treatment for Veterans With Moral Injury

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The objective of this project is to test the efficacy of an individual treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) stemming from moral injury called Impact of Killing (IOK), compared to a present-centered therapy (PCT) control condition, and to determine the rehabilitative utility of IOK for Veterans with PTSD. The first aim is to test whether IOK can help improve psychosocial functioning for Veterans, as well as PTSD symptoms. The second aim is to determine whether IOK gains made by Veterans in treatment are durable, as measured by a six-month follow-up assessment. Veterans who kill in war are at increased risk for functional difficulties, PTSD, alcohol abuse, and suicide. Even after current PTSD psychotherapies, most Veterans continue to meet diagnostic criteria for PTSD, highlighting the need for expanding treatments for PTSD and functioning. IOK is a treatment that can be provided following existing PTSD treatments, filling a critical gap for Veterans with moral injury who continue to suffer from mental health symptoms and functional difficulties.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Facilitating Transition to Recommended PTSD Treatment

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and prolonged exposure therapy (PE) were widely disseminated as recommended posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatments. However, post-9/11 Veterans with PTSD rarely initiate CPT or PE, especially as an initial treatment. Little research has explored the combinations and sequences of psychosocial and medication treatments that Veterans receive ("treatment sequences"). One common and understudied treatment sequence begins with stabilization treatment, which is designed to prepare Veterans for CPT or PE. There is a significant research gap in understanding how treatment sequence affects initiation of CPT or PE. The proposed research is an innovative, mixed-methods approach to assessing the impact of variability in treatment sequence, including stabilization treatment, on initiation of CPT or PE and applying this knowledge by developing a health services intervention that facilitates timely transition to CPT or PE. Research aims can improve PTSD treatment by increasing initiation of and reducing disparities in CPT/PE.

    San Francisco, California

  • Mobile Mindfulness for Alcohol Use and PTSD Among Veterans

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of the present study is to develop and test a mobile mindfulness intervention for Alcohol Use Disorder and PTSD among OEF/OIF veterans

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Tech and Telephone Smoking Cessation Treatment for Young Veterans With PTSD

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This project aims to enhance the scalability of an office-based smoking cessation treatment protocol for veterans with PTSD, integrated care (IC), by adapting it to be delivered over the telephone and to incorporate mobile technology components. Mobile technology components include: (1) the Stay Quit Coach (SQC) mobile application (app), and (2) the iCO® mobile Smokerlyzer®, a smart phone-compatible carbon monoxide monitor.

    San Francisco, California

Our lead scientists for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder research studies include .

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