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Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia clinical trials at UCSF

46 in progress, 23 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • BMF-500 in Adults With Acute Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1 first-in-human dose-escalation and dose-expansion study of BMF-500, an oral FLT3 inhibitor, in adult patients with acute leukemia.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • JNJ-75276617 in Participants With Acute Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose(s) (RP2D[s]) of JNJ-75276617 in Part 1 (Dose Escalation) and to determine safety and tolerability at the RP2D(s) in Part 2 (Dose Expansion).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Blinatumomab in Combination With Chemotherapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages up to 31 years

    This phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, standard risk B-lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma with or without Down syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as vincristine, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, pegaspargase, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and thioguanine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin decreases the toxic effects of methotrexate. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with B-ALL. This trial also assigns patients into different chemotherapy treatment regimens based on risk (the chance of cancer returning after treatment). Treating patients with chemotherapy based on risk may help doctors decide which patients can best benefit from which chemotherapy treatment regimens.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Allogeneic NK T-Cells Expressing CD19 Specific CAR in B-Cell Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 3-75

    This study is a multi-center study to evaluate the safety of KUR-502 in subjects with refractory/relapsed B-cell NHL or leukemia (ALL or CLL).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Caloric Restriction and Activity to Reduce Chemoresistance in B-ALL

    open to eligible people ages 10-25

    This study is for older children, adolescents, and young adults with B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL). Higher amounts of body fat is associated with resistance to chemotherapy in patients with B-ALL. Chemotherapy during the first month causes large gains in body fat in most people, even those who start chemotherapy at a healthy weight. This study is being done to find out if caloric restriction achieved by a personalized nutritional menu and exercise plan during routine chemotherapy can make the patient's ALL more sensitive to chemotherapy and also reduce the amount of body fat gained during treatment. The goals of this study are to help make chemotherapy more effective in treating the patient's leukemia as demonstrated by fewer patients with leukemia minimal residual disease (MRD) while also trying to reduce the amount of body fat that chemotherapy causes the patient to gain in the first month.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • HEalth Advocate for Liver Transplant - Pilot

    open to eligible people ages up to 17 years

    The Health Advocate for Liver Transplant (HEAL-Tx) Pilot is a nonrandomized, open-label intervention pilot of a health advocate intervention aimed to assess feasibility and acceptability of integrating a Health Advocate onto the transplant team. Across studies, health advocate roles vary, and can include coordinating medical care treatment, facilitating financial assistance (e.g., taxi vouchers), and connecting patients to community resources, which can improve self-management, mitigate social risks, and lead to better communication between the healthcare system and the family. In this pilot, the investigators will adapt this intervention for pediatric liver transplant patients and measure acceptability and feasibility according to RE-AIM.

    San Francisco, California

  • HLA-Mismatched Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation With Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide

    open to eligible people ages 1 year and up

    This is a prospective, multi-center, Phase II study of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) using human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated donors (MMUD) for peripheral blood stem cell transplant in adults and bone marrow stem cell transplant in children. Post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy), tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) will be used for for graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. This trial will study how well this treatment works in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate works in combination with two different chemotherapy regimens in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Imatinib mesylate has been shown to improve outcomes in children and adolescents with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) ALL when given with strong chemotherapy, but the combination has many side effects. This trial is testing whether a different chemotherapy regimen may work as well as the stronger one but have fewer side effects when given with imatinib. The trial is also testing how well the combination of chemotherapy and imatinib works in another group of patients with a type of ALL that is similar to Ph+ ALL. This type of ALL is called "ABL-class fusion positive ALL", and because it is similar to Ph+ ALL, is thought it will respond well to the combination of agents used to treat Ph+ ALL.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Post-Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and B-LLy

    open to eligible people ages 1-25

    This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase or calaspargase pegol work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Mismatched Related Donor Versus Matched Unrelated Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 21 years

    This phase III trial compares hematopoietic (stem) cell transplantation (HCT) using mismatched related donors (haploidentical [haplo]) versus matched unrelated donors (MUD) in treating children, adolescents, and young adults with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). HCT is considered standard of care treatment for patients with high-risk acute leukemia and MDS. In HCT, patients are given very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which is intended to kill cancer cells that may be resistant to more standard doses of chemotherapy; unfortunately, this also destroys the normal cells in the bone marrow, including stem cells. After the treatment, patients must have a healthy supply of stem cells reintroduced or transplanted. The transplanted cells then reestablish the blood cell production process in the bone marrow. The healthy stem cells may come from the blood or bone marrow of a related or unrelated donor. If patients do not have a matched related donor, doctors do not know what the next best donor choice is or if a haplo related donor or MUD is better. This trial may help researchers understand whether a haplo related donor or a MUD HCT for children with acute leukemia or MDS is better or if there is no difference at all.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Comparing Blinatumomab Alternating With Low-intensity Chemotherapy Versus Standard of Care Chemotherapy for Older Adults With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia-negative B-cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 40-100

    The safety run-in part of the study aims to evaluate the safety and tolerability of blinatumomab alternating with low-intensity chemotherapy. The phase 3 part of the study aims to compare event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of participants receiving blinatumomab alternating with low-intensity chemotherapy to EFS and (OS) of participants receiving standard of care (SOC) chemotherapy.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Brexucabtagene Autoleucel (KTE-X19) in Pediatric and Adolescent Participants With Relapsed/Refractory B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    The primary objectives of this study are to evaluate the safety and efficacy of brexucabtagene autoleucel (KTE-X19) in pediatric and adolescent participants with relapsed/refractory (r/r) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or relapsed or refractory (r/r) B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). As of October 2022, no further patients with acute B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) will be asked to join the study. The study remains open for recruitment for patients that have B-cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Carfilzomib in Combination With Induction Chemotherapy in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 1 month to 21 years

    The purpose of Phase 1b of this study is to: - Asses the safety, tolerability and activity of carfilzomib, alone and in combination with induction chemotherapy, in children with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). - Determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to recommend a phase 2 dose of carfilzomib in combination with induction chemotherapy. The purpose of Phase 2 of this study is to compare the rate of complete remission (CR) of carfilzomib in combination with vincristine, dexamethasone, PEG asparaginase, daunorubicin (VXLD) at the end of induction therapy to an appropriate external control.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Tisagenlecleucel in HR B-ALL EOC MRD Positive Patients

    open to eligible people ages 1-25

    This is a single arm, open-label, multi-center, phase II study to determine the efficacy and safety of tisagenlecleucel in de novo HR pediatric and young adult B-ALL patients who received first-line treatment and are EOC MRD positive. The study will have the following sequential phases: screening, pre-treatment, treatment & follow-up, and survival. After tisagenlecleucel infusion, patient will have assessments performed more frequently in the first month and then at Day 29, then every 3 months for the first year, every 6 months for the second year, then yearly until the end of the study. Efficacy and safety will be assessed at study visits and as clinically indicated throughout the study. The study is expected to end in approximately 8 years after first patient first treatment (FPFT). A post-study long term follow-up safety will continue under a separate protocol per health authority guidelines.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Levocarnitine in Protecting the Liver From Chemotherapy for Leukemia or Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 15-40

    This phase III trial compares the effect of adding levocarnitine to standard chemotherapy vs. standard chemotherapy alone in protecting the liver in patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Asparaginase is part of the standard of care chemotherapy for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL), and mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). However, in adolescent and young adults (AYA) ages 15-39 years, liver toxicity from asparaginase is common and often prevents delivery of planned chemotherapy, thereby potentially compromising outcomes. Some groups of people may also be at higher risk for liver damage due to the presence of fat in the liver even before starting chemotherapy. Patients who are of Japanese descent, Native Hawaiian, Hispanic or Latinx may be at greater risk for liver damage from chemotherapy for this reason. Carnitine is a naturally occurring nutrient that is part of a typical diet and is also made by the body. Carnitine is necessary for metabolism and its deficiency or absence is associated with liver and other organ damage. Levocarnitine is a drug used to provide extra carnitine. Laboratory and real-world usage of the dietary supplement levocarnitine suggests its potential to prevent or reduce liver toxicity from asparaginase. The overall goal of this study is to determine whether adding levocarnitine to standard of care chemotherapy will reduce the chance of developing severe liver damage from asparaginase chemotherapy in ALL, LL and/or MPAL patients.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Tagraxofusp in Pediatric Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD123 Expressing Hematologic Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    Tagraxofusp is a protein-drug conjugate consisting of a diphtheria toxin redirected to target CD123 has been approved for treatment in pediatric and adult patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN). This trial aims to examine the safety of this novel agent in pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory hematologic malignancies. The mechanism by which tagraxofusp kills cells is distinct from that of conventional chemotherapy. Tagraxofusp directly targets CD123 that is present on tumor cells, but is expressed at lower or levels or absent on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Tagraxofusp also utilizes a payload that is not cell cycle dependent, making it effective against both highly proliferative tumor cells and also quiescent tumor cells. The rationale for clinical development of tagraxofusp for pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies is based on the ubiquitous and high expression of CD123 on many of these diseases, as well as the highly potent preclinical activity and robust clinical responsiveness in adults observed to date. This trial includes two parts: a monotherapy phase and a combination chemotherapy phase. This design will provide further monotherapy safety data and confirm the FDA approved pediatric dose, as well as provide safety data when combined with chemotherapy. The goal of this study is to improve survival rates in children and young adults with relapsed hematological malignancies, determine the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of tagraxofusp given alone and in combination with chemotherapy, as well as to describe the toxicities, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic properties of tagraxofusp in pediatric patients. About 54 children and young adults will participate in this study. Patients with Down syndrome will be included in part 1 of the study.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • EndRAD Trial: Eliminating Total Body Irradiation (TBI) for NGS-MRD Negative Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With B-ALL

    open to eligible people ages 1-25

    This study will evaluate the use of non- TBI (total body irradiation) conditioning for B-ALL patients with low risk of relapse as defined by absence of NGS-MRD (next generation sequencing minimal residual disease) before receiving a hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). Patients diagnosed with B-ALL who are candidates for HCT will be screened by NGS-MRD on a test of bone marrow done before the HCT. Subjects who are pre-HCT NGS-MRD negative will be eligible to receive a non-TBI conditioning regimen as part of the treatment cohort of the study. Subjects who are pre-HCT NGS-MRD positive will be treated as per treating center standard and will be followed in an observational cohort (HCT center standard of care).

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Pediatric Acute Leukemia (PedAL) Screening Trial - A Study to Test Bone Marrow and Blood in Children With Leukemia That Has Come Back After Treatment or Is Difficult to Treat - A Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and Children's Oncology Group Study

    open to eligible people ages up to 22 years

    This study aims to use clinical and biological characteristics of acute leukemias to screen for patient eligibility for available pediatric leukemia sub-trials. Testing bone marrow and blood from patients with leukemia that has come back after treatment or is difficult to treat may provide information about the patient's leukemia that is important when deciding how to best treat it, and may help doctors find better ways to diagnose and treat leukemia in children, adolescents, and young adults.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Venetoclax Basket Trial for High Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 1-40

    This trial is evaluating the safety and tolerability of venetoclax with chemotherapy in pediatric and young adult patients with hematologic malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia derived from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS/AML), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)/lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL). The names of the study drugs involved in this study are below. Please note this is a list for the study as a whole, participants will receive drugs according to disease cohort. - Venetoclax - Azacitidine - Cytarabine - Methotrexate - Hydrocortisone - Leucovorin - Dexamethasone - Vincristine - Doxorubicin - Dexrazoxane - Calaspargase pegol - Hydrocortisone

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Learn More About the Health of Persons With Down Syndrome After Treatment for Acute Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 6-40

    This study attempts to learn more about the health of persons with Down syndrome after treatment for acute leukemia. Children with Down syndrome are at increased risk for side effects during treatment for acute leukemia, but it is unclear of their risk for long-term effects of cancer treatment. By learning more about the factors that may contribute to chronic health conditions and long-term effects after treatment for leukemia in persons with Down syndrome, clinical practice guidelines for survivorship care can be developed to help improve their quality-of-life.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Collecting and Storing Tissue From Young Patients With Cancer

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This laboratory study is collecting and storing tissue, blood, and bone marrow samples from young patients with cancer. Collecting and storing samples of tissue, blood, and bone marrow from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that may occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies

    open to all eligible people

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Blinatumomab Alone to Blinatumomab With Nivolumab in Patients Diagnosed With First Relapse B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL)

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II trial studies the effect of nivolumab in combination with blinatumomab compared to blinatumomab alone in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that has come back (relapsed). Down syndrome patients with relapsed B-ALL are included in this study. Blinatumomab is an antibody, which is a protein that identifies and targets specific molecules in the body. Blinatumomab searches for and attaches itself to the cancer cell. Once attached, an immune response occurs which may kill the cancer cell. Nivolumab is a medicine that may boost a patient's immune system. Giving nivolumab in combination with blinatumomab may cause the cancer to stop growing for a period of time, and for some patients, it may lessen the symptoms, such as pain, that are caused by the cancer.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • CTL019 Out of Specification MAP for ALL or DLBCL Patients

    Sorry, not accepting new patients

    Managed Access Program (MAP) to provide access to CTL019, for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or diffuse large b-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients with out of specification leukapheresis product and/or manufactured tisagenlecleucel out of specification for commercial release.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Ruxolitinib With Chemotherapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a nonrandomized study of ruxolitinib in combination with a standard multi-agent chemotherapy regimen for the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Part 1 of the study will optimize the dose of study drug (ruxolitinib) in combination with the chemotherapy regimen. Part 2 will evaluate the efficacy of combination chemotherapy and ruxolitinib at the recommended dose determined in Part 1.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • CD19 Targeted CAR T Cell Therapy in Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase Ib/II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of autologous T cells engineered with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD19 in adult patients with relapsed or refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Ponatinib With Chemotherapy in Children, Teenagers, and Adults With Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This study is about an anticancer drug called ponatinib which is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor given with chemotherapy to children, teenagers, and young adults up to 21 years of age with Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia who have relapsed or are resistant to other treatment. The main aims of this study are to confirm the highest dose of ponatinib tablets and minitablet capsules that can be given to participants with acceptable side effects, and to evaluate if participant's leukemia achieves remission. Participants will take ponatinib tablets with chemotherapy. For participants who cannot swallow tablets or who are receiving less than a 10 mg dose, a capsule with small ponatinib minitablets inside will be provided. Participants will take ponatinib for 10 weeks in combination with chemotherapy (reinduction and consolidation blocks) and will be followed up for at least 3 years.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • SNDX-5613 in Combination With Chemotherapy in Participants With R/R Acute Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and tolerability of SNDX-5613 when given in combination with 2 different chemotherapy regimens in participants with relapsed/refractory acute leukemias harboring KMT2A rearrangement, KMT2A amplification, NPM1c, or NUP98r.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Azacitidine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and KMT2A Gene Rearrangement

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Blinatumomab and Pembrolizumab for Adults With Relapsed/Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With High Marrow Lymphoblasts

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase I/II study of blinatumomab in combination with pembrolizumab in adult patients with relapsed or refractory B-lineage ALL (B-ALL). The primary objective of this study is to determine if the addition of pembrolizumab to blinatumomab improves the Complete Response Rate (CR) and Complete Remission with Partial Hematologic Recovery (CRh) relative to blinatumomab alone in adult subjects with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with high bone marrow lymphoblast percentage (>50% lymphoblasts).

    Clovis, California and other locations

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Immunotherapy with blinatumomab may allow the body's immune system to attack and destroy some types of leukemia cells. It is not yet known whether blinatumomab is more effective than standard combination chemotherapy in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is likely to come back or spread, and in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitive mutations. Chemotherapy drugs, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving the drugs in different doses and in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial is studying different combination chemotherapy regimens and their side effects and comparing how well they work in treating young patients with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. It is not yet known which combination chemotherapy regimen is more effective in treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. After a common induction therapy, patients were risk assigned and eligible for one or both post-induction randomizations: Escalating dose Methotrexate versus High Dose Methotrexate in Interim Maintenance therapy, No Nelarabine versus Nelarabine in Consolidation therapy. T-ALL patients are risk assigned as Low Risk, Intermediate Risk or High Risk. Low Risk patients are not eligible for the Nelarabine randomization, Patients with CNS disease at diagnosis were assgined to receive High Dose Methotrexate, patients who failed induction therapy were assigned to receive Nelarabine and High Dose Methotrexate. T-LLy patients were all assigned to escalating dose Methotrexate and were risk assigned as Standard Risk, High Risk and induction failures. Standard risk patients did not receive nelarabine, High risk T-LLy patients were randomized to No Nelarabine versus Nelarabine, and Induction failures were assigned to receive Nelarabine.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Stage II-IV T-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial compares how well combination chemotherapy works when given with or without bortezomib in treating patients with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or stage II-IV T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Bortezomib may help reduce the number of leukemia or lymphoma cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It may also help chemotherapy work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known if giving standard chemotherapy with or without bortezomib is more effective in treating newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Lestaurtinib in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy with or without lestaurtinib with to see how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of stop cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Lestaurtinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without lestaurtinib in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Cord Blood Transplant With Dilanubicel for the Treatment of HIV Positive Hematologic Cancers

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of a cord blood transplant using dilanubicel and to see how well it works in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive hematologic (blood) cancers. After a cord blood transplant, the immune cells, including white blood cells, can take a while to recover, putting the patient at increased risk of infection. Dilanubicel consists of blood stem cells that help to produce mature blood cells, including immune cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total body irradiation is a type of whole-body radiation. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a cord blood transplant with dilanubicel may help to kill any cancer cells that are in the body and make room in the patient's bone marrow for new stem cells to grow and reduce the risk of infection.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Younger Patients With B-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma or Relapsed or Refractory CD22 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating younger patients with B-lymphoblastic lymphoma or CD22 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • KIR Favorable Mismatched Haplo Transplant and KIR Polymorphism in ALL/AML/MDS Allo-HCT Children

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a phase II, open-label, non-randomized, prospective study of haploidentical transplantation using KIR-favorable donors for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The relationship of KIR2DL1 polymorphisms to survival in children with these diseases undergoing any approach to allogeneic HCT during the study time frame will also be determined.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Palbociclib in Combination With Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (LL)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    AINV18P1 is a Phase 1 study where palbociclib will be administrated in combination with a standard re-induction platform in pediatric relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL). LL patients are included because the patient population is rare and these patients are most commonly treated with ALL regimens. The proposed palbociclib starting dose for this study will be 50 mg/m^2/day for 21 days.

    Palo Alto, California and other locations

  • Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study involves participants who have acute lymphoblastic or acute myelogenous leukemia that has relapsed or has become resistant (or refractory) to standard therapies. This research study is evaluating a drug called KPT-330. Laboratory and other studies suggest that the study drug, KPT-330, may prevent leukemia cells from growing and may lead to the destruction of leukemia cells. It is thought that KPT-330 activates cellular processes that increase the death of leukemia cells. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the side effects of KPT-330 when it is administered to children and adolescents with relapsed or refractory leukemia.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of different combinations of risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens and how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma that is found only in the tissue or organ where it began (localized). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), giving the drugs in different doses, and giving the drugs in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Cancer Care Delivery in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study investigates cancer care delivery in adolescent and young adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Surveying institutions, evaluating delivery of care at the patient level and seeking input from healthcare providers may help doctors increase rates of adherence to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) treatment guidelines. It may also improve care for adolescent and young adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Cytogenetic Studies in Acute Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Chromosomal analysis or the study of genetic differences in patients previously untreated with AML, ALL, MDS or MM may be helpful in the diagnosis and classification of disease. It may also improve the ability to predict the course of disease and the selection of therapy. Institutions must have either an Alliance-approved cytogeneticist or an agreement from an Alliance-approved main member cytogenetics laboratory to enroll a patient on CALGB 8461. The Alliance Approved Institutional Cytogeneticists list is posted on the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology website.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Diagnostic Study of Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research trial studies molecular genetic features in blood and tissue samples from patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute promyelocytic leukemia. Studying samples of blood and tissue from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute promyelocytic leukemia in the laboratory may help doctors identify and learn more about biomarkers related to cancer.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Natural History and Biology of Long-Term Late Effects Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Childhood Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective non-therapeutic study, assessing the long-term toxicity of pediatric HCT for hematologic malignancies. This study is a collaboration between the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC), the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), the National Marrow Transplant Program (NMDP) and the Resource for Clinical Investigation in Blood and Marrow Transplantation (RCI-BMT) of the CIBMTR. The study will enroll pediatric patients who undergo myeloablative HCT for hematologic malignancies at PBMTC sites.

    Oakland, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia research studies include .

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