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Acute Myeloid Leukemia clinical trials at UCSF

34 in progress, 14 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Multicenter Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • A Safety and Efficacy Study of CC-90009 Combinations in Subjects With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    CC-90009-AML-002 is an exploratory Phase 1b open-label multi-arm trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CC-90009 in combination with anti-leukemia agents in subjects with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of JNJ-75276617 in Participants With Acute Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose(s) (RP2D[s]) of JNJ-75276617 in Part 1 (Dose Escalation) and to determine safety and tolerability at the RP2D(s) in Part 2 (Dose Expansion).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of MBG453 in Combination With Azacitidine and Venetoclax in AML Patients Unfit for Chemotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will seek to extend the preliminary findings of efficacy of MBG453 in combination with hypomethylating agents (HMA) by evaluating MBG453 in combination with the HMA azacitidine and the Bcl-2 inhibitor venetoclax.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Venetoclax in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages up to 25 years

    An open-label, global, multi-center study to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of venetoclax monotherapy, to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the recommended Phase 2 dose (RPTD), and to assess the preliminary efficacy of venetoclax in pediatric and young adult participants with relapsed or refractory malignancies.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study to Compare Standard Chemotherapy to Therapy With CPX-351 and/or Gilteritinib for Patients With Newly Diagnosed AML With or Without FLT3 Mutations

    open to eligible people ages up to 22 years

    This phase III trial compares standard chemotherapy to therapy with liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine (CPX-351) and/or gilteritinib for patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia with or without FLT3 mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin, cytarabine, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. CPX-351 is made up of daunorubicin and cytarabine and is made in a way that makes the drugs stay in the bone marrow longer and could be less likely to cause heart problems than traditional anthracycline drugs, a common class of chemotherapy drug. Some acute myeloid leukemia patients have an abnormality in the structure of a gene called FLT3. Genes are pieces of DNA (molecules that carry instructions for development, functioning, growth and reproduction) inside each cell that tell the cell what to do and when to grow and divide. FLT3 plays an important role in the normal making of blood cells. This gene can have permanent changes that cause it to function abnormally by making cancer cells grow. Gilteritinib may block the abnormal function of the FLT3 gene that makes cancer cells grow. The overall goals of this study are, 1) to compare the effects, good and/or bad, of CPX-351 with daunorubicin and cytarabine on people with newly diagnosed AML to find out which is better, 2) to study the effects, good and/or bad, of adding gilteritinib to AML therapy for patients with high amounts of FLT3/ITD or other FLT3 mutations and 3) to study changes in heart function during and after treatment for AML. Giving CPX-351 and/or gilteritinib with standard chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to standard chemotherapy alone.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Collecting and Storing Tissue From Young Patients With Cancer

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This laboratory study is collecting and storing tissue, blood, and bone marrow samples from young patients with cancer. Collecting and storing samples of tissue, blood, and bone marrow from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that may occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • CPX-351 and Glasdegib for Newly Diagnosed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia With MDS Related Changes or Therapy-related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 2 single-arm, open-label clinical trial determining efficacy of CPX-351 in combination with Glasdegib in subjects with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with myelodysplastic syndrome related changes or therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Gilteritinib vs Midostaurin in FLT3 Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    Eligible untreated patients with FLT3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) between the ages of 18 and 70 will be randomized to receive gilteritinib or midostaurin during induction and consolidation. Patients will also receive standard chemotherapy of daunorubicin and cytarabine during induction and high-dose cytarabine during consolidation. Gilteritinib, is an oral drug that works by stopping the leukemia cells from making the FLT3 protein. This may help stop the leukemia cells from growing faster and thus may help make chemotherapy more effective. Gilteritinib has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for patients who have relapsed or refractory AML with a FLT3 mutation but is not approved by the FDA for newly diagnosed FLT3 AML, and its use in this setting is considered investigational. Midostaurin is an oral drug that works by blocking several proteins on cancer cells, including FLT3 that can help leukemia cells grow. Blocking this pathway can cause death to the leukemic cells. Midostaurin is approved by the FDA for the treatment of FLT3 AML. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of gilteritinib to midostaurin in patients receiving combination chemotherapy for FLT3 AML.

    Clovis, California and other locations

  • IO-202 as Monotherapy and IO-202 Plus Azacitidine in Patients in AML and CMML

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    To assess safety and tolerability at increasing dose levels of IO-202 as monotherapy and in combination with Azacitidine in successive cohorts of participants with relapsed or refractory AML with monocytic differentiation and CMML in order to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD) and select the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and dose schedule as monotherapy and combination therapy.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Safety and Effectiveness of Quizartinib in Children and Young Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), a Cancer of the Blood

    open to eligible people ages 1 month to 21 years

    Quizartinib is an experimental drug. It is not approved for regular use. It can only be used in medical research. Children or young adults with a certain kind of blood cancer (FLT3-ITD AML) might be able to join this study if it has come back after remission or is not responding to treatment.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study Evaluating Safety and Efficacy of UCART123 in Patients With Relapsed/ Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Phase I, first-in-human, open-label, dose-escalation and dose-expansion study evaluating the safety and efficacy of UCART targeting CD123 in patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and clinical activity of UCART123v1.2 and determine the Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) and Recommended Phase 2 Dose (RP2D).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study of Biomarker-Based Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This screening and multi-sub-study Phase 1b/2 trial will establish a method for genomic screening followed by assigning and accruing simultaneously to a multi-study "Master Protocol (BAML-16-001-M1)." The specific subtype of acute myeloid leukemia will determine which sub-study, within this protocol, a participant will be assigned to evaluate investigational therapies or combinations with the ultimate goal of advancing new targeted therapies for approval. The study also includes a marker negative sub-study which will include all screened patients not eligible for any of the biomarker-driven sub-studies.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • The Pediatric Acute Leukemia (PedAL) Screening Trial - A Study to Test Bone Marrow and Blood in Children With Leukemia That Has Come Back After Treatment or Is Difficult to Treat - A Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and Children's Oncology Group Study

    open to eligible people ages up to 22 years

    This study aims to use clinical and biological characteristics of acute leukemias to screen for patient eligibility for available pediatric leukemia sub-trials. Testing bone marrow and blood from patients with leukemia that has come back after treatment or is difficult to treat may provide information about the patient's leukemia that is important when deciding how to best treat it, and may help doctors find better ways to diagnose and treat leukemia in children, adolescents, and young adults.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • CPX-351 Plus Enasidenib for Relapsed AML

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This trial evaluates how well CPX-351 and enasidenib work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia characterized by IHD2 mutation. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as CPX-351, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Enasidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving CPX-351 and enasidenib may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, compared to giving only one of these therapies alone.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of ASP2215 Versus Salvage Chemotherapy in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase (FLT3) Mutation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical benefit of ASP2215 therapy in participants with FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to or have relapsed after first-line AML therapy as shown with overall survival (OS) compared to salvage chemotherapy, and to determine the efficacy of ASP2215 therapy as assessed by the rate of complete remission and complete remission with partial hematological recovery (CR/CRh) in these participants. This study will also determine the overall efficacy in event-free survival (EFS) and complete remission (CR) rate of ASP2215 compared to salvage chemotherapy.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of ASTX660 as a Single Agent and in Combination With ASTX727 in Subjects With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    To evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and efficacy of ASTX660 when given alone and in combination with ASTX727 in participants with relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The duration of the study is expected to be approximately 30 months.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study of PRT543 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors and Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 1 cohort, dose-escalation, dose-expansion study of PRT543 in patients with advanced cancers who have exhausted available treatment options. The purpose of this study is to define a safe dose and schedule to be used in subsequent development of PRT543.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Trial of the FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3) Inhibitor Gilteritinib Administered as Maintenance Therapy Following Allogeneic Transplant for Patients With FLT3/Internal Tandem Duplication (ITD) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to compare relapse-free survival between participants with FLT3/ITD AML in first morphologic complete remission (CR1) who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) and are randomized to receive gilteritinib or placebo beginning after the time of engraftment for a two year period.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Bortezomib and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well bortezomib and sorafenib tosylate work in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Bortezomib and sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving bortezomib and sorafenib tosylate together with combination chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial is studying combination chemotherapy to see how well it works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Cord Blood Transplant With OTS for the Treatment of HIV Positive Hematologic Cancers

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of a cord blood transplant using OTS and to see how well it works in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive hematologic (blood) cancers. After a cord blood transplant, the immune cells, including white blood cells, can take a while to recover, putting the patient at increased risk of infection. OTS consists of blood stem cells that help to produce mature blood cells, including immune cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total body irradiation is a type of whole-body radiation. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a cord blood transplant with OTS may help to kill any cancer cells that are in the body and make room in the patient's bone marrow for new stem cells to grow and reduce the risk of infection.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • CPX-351 and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin when given together with CPX-351 in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back after it was previously in remission. CPX-351 is a chemotherapy, which works in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called gemtuzumab, linked to chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 (transmembrane receptor) positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Giving CPX-351 and gemtuzumab ozogamicin may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, compared to giving only one of these therapies alone.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Cytogenetic Studies in Acute Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Chromosomal analysis or the study of genetic differences in patients previously untreated with AML, ALL, MDS or MM may be helpful in the diagnosis and classification of disease. It may also improve the ability to predict the course of disease and the selection of therapy. Institutions must have either an Alliance-approved cytogeneticist or an agreement from an Alliance-approved main member cytogenetics laboratory to enroll a patient on CALGB 8461. The Alliance Approved Institutional Cytogeneticists list is posted on the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology website.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Efficacy of Oral Azacitidine Plus Best Supportive Care as Maintenance Therapy in Subjects With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in Complete Remission

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study enrolled 472 participants, aged 55 or older, with a diagnosis of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or AML secondary to prior myelodysplastic disease or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and who have achieved first complete remission (CR)/ complete remission with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) following induction with or without consolidation chemotherapy. The study is amended to include an extension phase (EP). The EP allows participants who are currently receiving oral azacitidine and who are demonstrating clinical benefit as assessed by the investigator, to continue receiving oral azacitidine after unblinding by sponsor until the participant meets the criteria for study discontinuation or until oral azacitidine becomes commercially available and reimbursed. In addition, all participants in the placebo arm and participants who had been discontinued from the treatment phase (irrespective of randomization arm) and continuing in the follow-up phase will be followed for survival in the EP.

    Fresno, California and other locations

  • Flotetuzumab for the Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of flotetuzumab and how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with flotetuzumab may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of leukemia cells to grow and spread. Giving flotetuzumab may stop the leukemia from growing or shrink for a period of time, as well as possibly lessening symptoms, such as pain, that are caused by the leukemia.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Flotetuzumab in Primary Induction Failure (PIF) or Early Relapse (ER) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Open-label, multi-dose, single-arm, multi-center, Phase 1/2 study conducted in three segments: the Single Patient Dose Escalation Segment (complete), followed by the Multi-Patient Dose Escalation Segment (complete) and the Maximum Tolerated Dose and Schedule (MTDS) Expansion Cohort Segment (ongoing). Having characterized safety and determined the maximum tolerated dose and schedule, the primary objective of this study now is to assess the anti-neoplastic activity of flotetuzumab in patients with PIF/ER AML, as determined by the proportion of patients who achieve CR or CRh. Starting with Cycle 2, patients who are benefiting from flotetuzumab may receive up to a maximum of 8 cycles of treatment. Patients will receive daily increasing doses of flotetuzumab for the first week of Cycle 1 (Lead-In Dosing) followed by 3 weeks of continuous intravenous infusion at a specifiedthe assigned dose. Subsequent cycles are each 4 weeks of continuous infusion at the assigned dose. Dosing may continue for up to 8 cycles. Follow up visits may continue for 6 months after treatment is discontinued.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • KIR Favorable Mismatched Haplo Transplant and KIR Polymorphism in ALL/AML/MDS Allo-HCT Children

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a phase II, open-label, non-randomized, prospective study of haploidentical transplantation using KIR-favorable donors for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The relationship of KIR2DL1 polymorphisms to survival in children with these diseases undergoing any approach to allogeneic HCT during the study time frame will also be determined.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Liposome-encapsulated Daunorubicin-Cytarabine, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine when given with fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back after treatment (relapsed) or is not responding to treatment (is refractory). Liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine is made up of two chemotherapy drugs, cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride, and works to stop cancer cell growth by blocking the cells from dividing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Filgrastim may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine followed by fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim may be a better treatment for patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and may cause fewer side effects to the heart, a common effect of other chemotherapy treatments for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Natural History and Biology of Long-Term Late Effects Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Childhood Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective non-therapeutic study, assessing the long-term toxicity of pediatric HCT for hematologic malignancies. This study is a collaboration between the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC), the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), the National Marrow Transplant Program (NMDP) and the Resource for Clinical Investigation in Blood and Marrow Transplantation (RCI-BMT) of the CIBMTR. The study will enroll pediatric patients who undergo myeloablative HCT for hematologic malignancies at PBMTC sites.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Pevonedistat, Azacitidine, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well pevonedistat, azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Pevonedistat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as azacitidine, fludarabine phosphate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and pevonedistat may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Phase I Trial of the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study involves participants who have acute lymphoblastic or acute myelogenous leukemia that has relapsed or has become resistant (or refractory) to standard therapies. This research study is evaluating a drug called KPT-330. Laboratory and other studies suggest that the study drug, KPT-330, may prevent leukemia cells from growing and may lead to the destruction of leukemia cells. It is thought that KPT-330 activates cellular processes that increase the death of leukemia cells. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the side effects of KPT-330 when it is administered to children and adolescents with relapsed or refractory leukemia.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients With Down Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Study of APVO436 in Patients With AML or MDS

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The primary objective of the Phase 1 part of the study is to determine the recommended dose of APVO436 administered intravenously to patients with AML or MDS. The primary objective of the Phase 1b part of the study is to evaluate the clinical activity of APVO436 in patients with AML or MDS. APVO436 is being studied in this Phase 1b, open-label, multi-center, two-part dose-escalation/dose expansion study to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD), and clinical activity of APVO436 in patients with AML and MDS. The study will be conducted in 2 parts. The first part of this Phase 1B study is an open-label, multiple dose ascending dose escalation phase to determine the recommended dose (RP2D) level of APVO436 for future Phase 2 studies. The goal of the dose expansion phase of the study (Part 2) is to (i) evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care and (ii) obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities. Study Objectives for Dose Escalation Phase - Primary Objectives are to: 1. Determine the RP2D level of APVO436 administered intravenously (IV) in patients with AML or MDS, and 2. Evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care and obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities. - Secondary Objectives are to: 1. Define the safety profile and immunogenicity of APVO436; to determine the PK/PD of APVO436; to evaluate the clinical activity of APVO436 in AML and MDS patients. 2. Further evaluate the safety profile and immunogenicity of APVO436 and the PK/PD of APVO436 and the relationship between PK/PD and clinical response. Study Objectives for Dose Expansion Phase - Primary Objective is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of APVO436 at the RP2D level when it is used as an adjunct to the standard of care. - Secondary Objective is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the anti-leukemia activity of APVO436-containing experimental monotherapy and combination therapy modalities.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Acute Myeloid Leukemia research studies include .