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Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation clinical trials at UCSF

19 in progress, 9 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of BIVV003 for Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18-40

    This is an open label, multicenter, Phase 1/2 study in approximately eight adults with severe Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). The study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using BIVV003.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Biomarker Verification in Pediatric Chronic GvHD: ABLE 2.0 / PTCTC GVH 1901 Study

    open to eligible people ages up to 24 years

    This study will validate a previously developed pediatric prognostic biomarker algorithm aimed at improving prediction of risk for the later development of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD) in children and young adults undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. By developing an early risk stratification of patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk for future cGvHD development (based upon their biomarker profile, before the onset of cGvHD), pre-emptive therapies aimed at preventing the onset of cGvHD can be developed based upon an individual's biological risk profile. This study will also continue research into diagnostic biomarkers of cGvHD, and begin work into biomarker models that predict clinical response to cGvHD therapies.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • JSP191 Antibody Targeting Conditioning in SCID Patients

    open to eligible people ages 3 months and up

    A Phase 1/2 study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of an antibody conditioning regimen, known as JSP191, in patients with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency undergoing blood stem cell transplantation

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Livionex Oral Microbiome and Dental Plaque Control in HSCT Recipients

    open to all eligible people

    Children undergoing chemotherapy, radiation treatment and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) have significant difficulties achieving good oral hygiene and dental plaque control. HSCT recipients are at a significant risk for bacteremia and sepsis. Livionex® toothpaste was shown to be effective in reducing dental plaques while containing no additives found in other toothpastes that can cause increased gingival irritation. The investigators hypothesize that improved oral hygiene and better plaque control in pediatric patients receiving chemo/radiation treatment or HSCT may result in reduced oral inflammation, decreased amount of oral bacterial pathogens, and reduced risk of oral-pathogen related systemic bacterial infections. The overall goal of this prospective randomized (2:1) pilot study is to determine whether incorporation of the Livionex® toothpaste in the research regimen could reduce dental plaque.

    San Francisco, California

  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies

    open to all eligible people

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • RCT of Olanzapine for Control of CIV in Children Receiving HSCT Conditioning

    open to eligible people ages 30 months to 18 years

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are among the most bothersome symptoms during cancer treatment according to children and their parents. Most children receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) conditioning experience CINV despite receiving antiemetic prophylaxis. Olanzapine improves CINV control in adult cancer patients, has a track record of safe use in children with psychiatric illness, does not interact with chemotherapy and is inexpensive. We hypothesize that the addition of olanzapine to standard antiemetics will improve chemotherapy-induced vomiting (CIV) control in children receiving chemotherapy for HSCT conditioning.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study of Posoleucel (ALVR105, Formerly Viralym-M) for Multi-Virus Prevention in Patients Post-Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 1 year and up

    This is a Phase 3 study to evaluate posoleucel (ALVR105, formerly Viralym-M); an allogeneic, off-the-shelf multi-virus specific T cell therapy that targets six viral pathogens: BK virus, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human herpesvirus 6 and JC virus.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Treosulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen Before a Blood or Bone Marrow Transplant for the Treatment of Bone Marrow Failure Diseases (BMT CTN 1904)

    open to eligible people ages 1-49

    This phase II trial tests whether treosulfan, fludarabine, and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) work when given before a blood or bone marrow transplant (conditioning regimen) to cause fewer complications for patients with bone marrow failure diseases. Chemotherapy drugs, such as treosulfan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Fludarabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. rATG is used to decrease the body's immune response and may improve bone marrow function and increase blood cell counts. Adding treosulfan to a conditioning regimen with fludarabine and rATG may result in patients having less severe complications after a blood or bone marrow transplant.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • US Phase I Study of ECT-001-CB in Patients With Sickle-Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 5-30

    The application of experimental hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) therapy in sickle-cell disease (SCD) must strike a balance between the underlying disease severity and the possibility of a direct benefit of the treatment, particularly in pediatric populations. Clinical studies in adults with SCD have focused on interventions that prolong survival and improve the quality of life. Unlike children, adults with SCD are much more likely to have a debilitating complication. As a result, the risk/benefit ratio of HCT is very favorable in adults, particularly if an approach to HCT that defines an acceptable level of toxicity can be established. Whereas hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only curative treatment currently available for patients with SCD, the morbidity, the frequent irreversible damage in target organs and the mortality reported in the natural course of patients with severe SCD are strong incentives to perform HSCTs in younger age groups. For those who lack a matched related donor, CB transplant is an appealing option, but despite been less problematic, CB accessibility related to cell dose of appropriately matched cord blood unit (CBU) remains a significant issue. Through a 7-day culture process of a CBU's hematopoietic stem cell HSCs with the UM171 compound, the total cell dose is increased mitigating this limitation. UM171-CB expansion (ECT-001-CB) allows a greater CB accessibility, the selection of better matched cords that might translate into favourable clinical outcomes as reported in previous trials, including a lower risk of graft-versus-host disease. After CB selection and ex-vivo expansion, ECT-001-CB transplant will follow a myeloablative reduced-toxicity conditioning regimen consisting of rATG, busulfan and fludarabine with doses of all agents optimized to the individual using model-based dosing and will be followed by standard supportive care and GVHD prophylaxis consisting of tacrolimus and MMF.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • A Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of ST-400 for Treatment of Transfusion-Dependent Beta-thalassemia (TDT)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a single-arm, multi-site, single-dose, Phase 1/2 study to assess ST-400 in 6 subjects with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia (TDT) who are ≥18 and ≤40 years of age. ST-400 is a type of investigational therapy that consists of gene edited cells. ST-400 is composed of the patient's own blood stem cells which are genetically modified in the laboratory using Sangamo's zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology to disrupt a precise and specific sequence of the enhancer of the BCL11A gene (which normally suppresses fetal hemoglobin production in erythrocytes). This process is intended to boost fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which can substitute for reduced or absent adult (defective) hemoglobin. ST-400 is then infused back into the patient after receiving conditioning chemotherapy to make room for the new cells in the bone marrow, with the aim of producing new erythrocytes with increased amounts of HbF. The primary objective is to understand safety and tolerability of ST-400, and secondary objectives are to assess the effects on HbF levels and transfusion requirements.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Antiviral Cellular Therapy for Enhancing T-cell Reconstitution Before or After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether virus-specific T cell lines (VSTs) are safe and can effectively control three viruses (EBV, CMV, and adenovirus) in patients who have had a stem cell transplant and also in patients that have a primary immunodeficiency disorder with no prior stem cell transplant.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • High Dose Flu Vaccine in Treating Children Who Have Undergone Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II randomized trial studies how well high dose flu vaccine works in treating children who have undergone done stem cell transplant. Higher dose flu vaccine may build a better immune response and may provide better protection against the flu than the standard vaccine.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Identifying Best Approach in Improving Quality of Life and Survival After a Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Older, Medically Infirm, or Frail Patients With Blood Diseases

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II/III trial studies the best approach in improving quality of life and survival after a donor stem cell transplant in older, weak, or frail patients with blood diseases. Patients who have undergone a transplant often experience increases in disease and death. One approach, supportive and palliative care (SPC), focuses on relieving symptoms of stress from serious illness and care through physical, cultural, psychological, social, spiritual, and ethical aspects. While a second approach, clinical management of comorbidities (CMC) focuses on managing multiple diseases, other than cancer, such as heart or lung diseases through physical exercise, strength training, stress reduction, medication management, dietary recommendations, and education. Giving SPC, CMC, or a combination of both may work better in improving quality of life and survival after a donor stem cell transplant compared to standard of care in patients with blood diseases.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • In Utero Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Alpha-thalassemia Major (ATM)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators aims to evaluate the safety of in utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in fetuses with alpha-thalassemia major performed at the time of in utero transfusion of red blood cells.

    San Francisco, California

  • KIR Favorable Mismatched Haplo Transplant and KIR Polymorphism in ALL/AML/MDS Allo-HCT Children

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a phase II, open-label, non-randomized, prospective study of haploidentical transplantation using KIR-favorable donors for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The relationship of KIR2DL1 polymorphisms to survival in children with these diseases undergoing any approach to allogeneic HCT during the study time frame will also be determined.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Natural History and Biology of Long-Term Late Effects Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Childhood Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective non-therapeutic study, assessing the long-term toxicity of pediatric HCT for hematologic malignancies. This study is a collaboration between the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC), the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), the National Marrow Transplant Program (NMDP) and the Resource for Clinical Investigation in Blood and Marrow Transplantation (RCI-BMT) of the CIBMTR. The study will enroll pediatric patients who undergo myeloablative HCT for hematologic malignancies at PBMTC sites.

    Oakland, California and other locations

  • Posoleucel (ALVR105, Formerly Viralym-M) for Multi-Virus Prevention in Patients Post-Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 2 study to evaluate posoleucel (ALVR105, formerly Viralym-M); an allogeneic, off-the-shelf multi-virus specific T cell therapy that targets six viral pathogens: BK virus, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human herpesvirus 6 and JC virus.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study of Thiotepa and TEPA Drug Exposure in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Thiotepa is a chemotherapy drug used extensively in bone marrow transplantation. Thiotepa is a prodrug that undergoes metabolic conversion in the liver by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 to its primary active metabolite, TEPA. The goal of this study is to determine what causes some children to have different drug concentrations of thiotepa and TEPA in their bodies and if drug levels are related to whether or not a child experiences severe side-effects during their bone marrow transplant. The hypothesis is that certain clinical and genetic factors cause changes in thiotepa and TEPA drug levels in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients and that high levels may cause severe side-effects.

    San Francisco, California

  • TAC/MTX vs. TAC/MMF/PTCY for Prevention of Graft-versus-Host Disease and Microbiome and Immune Reconstitution Study (BMT CTN 1703/1801)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    1703: The study is designed as a randomized, phase III, multicenter trial comparing two acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) prophylaxis regimens: tacrolimus/methotrexate (Tac/MTX) versus post-transplant cyclophosphamide/tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil (PTCy/Tac/MMF) in the setting of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation. 1801: The goal of this protocol is to test the primary hypothesis that the engraftment stool microbiome diversity predicts one-year non-relapse mortality in patients undergoing reduced intensity allogeneic HCT.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation research studies include .

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