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Kidney Disease clinical trials at UCSF

17 in progress, 12 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Test BI 764198 in People With a Type of Kidney Disease Called Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This study is open to adults with a type of kidney disease called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The purpose of this study is to find out whether a medicine called BI 764198 improves the health of the kidneys in people with FSGS. Three different doses of BI 764198 are tested in this study. Participants are put into 4 groups randomly, which means by chance. Three of the groups receive different doses of BI 764198 and one group receives placebo. Participants are in the study for about 4 months. For about 3 months, they take BI 764198 or placebo as capsules once a day. Placebo capsules look like BI 764198 capsules but do not contain any medicine. Participants visit the study site about 10 times. You can participate in this study from your home. In this case a research nurse will visit you for the study visits. Kidney health is assessed based on the analysis of urine samples, which participants collect at home. At the end of the study, the results are compared between the different groups. During the study, the doctors also regularly check the general health of the participants.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • ARTEMIS: Ravulizumab to Protect Patients With CKD From CSA-AKI and MAKE

    open to eligible people ages 18-90

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of a single dose of ravulizumab IV compared with placebo in reducing the risk of the clinical consequences of AKI (MAKE) at 90 days in adult participants with CKD who undergo non-emergent cardiac surgery with CPB.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Ferric Citrate and Chronic Kidney Disease in Children

    open to eligible people ages 6-18

    We will conduct a 12-month, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to assess the effects of therapy with ferric citrate (FC) on changes in intact FGF23 levels (iFGF23, primary endpoint) in 160 pediatric patients (80 in each of the two arms) aged 6-18 years of either sex with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3-4 and age-appropriate normal serum phosphate levels. Participants will be randomized to one of the two groups: 1) FC or 2) FC placebo. Participants will be recruited from 12 core clinical sites.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • VX-147 in Adult and Pediatric Participants With APOL1- Mediated Proteinuric Kidney Disease

    open to eligible people ages 10-65

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of VX-147 in adult and pediatric participants with apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1)-mediated proteinuric kidney disease.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • DCR-PHXC in Patients With PH1/2 and ESRD

    open to all eligible people

    The aim of this study is to evaluate DCR-PHXC in participants with PH1 or PH2 and severe renal impairment, with or without dialysis.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Desensitization of Chronic Kidney Disease in Adult Patients in Need of a Kidney Transplant Who Are Highly Sensitized to Human Leukocyte Antigen

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    The primary objective of the study is to assess the safety and tolerability of REGN5459 (Part A) or REGN5458 (Part B) as monotherapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who need kidney transplantation and are highly sensitized to human leukocyte antigen (HLA). The secondary objectives of the study are to determine/assess the following for REGN5459 (Part A) or REGN5458 (Part B): - Dose regimen(s) that result in a clinically meaningful reduction of anti-HLA alloantibody levels - Effect on calculated panel-reactive antibody (cPRA) levels - Time to maximal and clinically meaningful reduction in anti-HLA alloantibody levels - Duration of the effect of study drug on the reduction of anti-HLA alloantibodies - Effect on circulating immunoglobulin (Ig) classes (isotypes) - Pharmacokinetics (PK) properties - Immunogenicity

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Ferric Citrate in Children With Hyperphosphatemia Related to Chronic Kidney Disease

    open to eligible people ages 6-16

    This study will be conducted to assess the safety and tolerability of ferric citrate in pediatric participants with hyperphosphatemia related to chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Home Blood Pressure (BP) Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The main study will be a two arm 10-month, cross-over randomized controlled trial of 200 participants treated with end-stage-kidney-disease treated with in-center hemodialysis in the Seattle and San Francisco area comparing a strategy of targeting home vs. pre-dialysis systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg to reduce rates of intradialytic hypotension. The target systolic blood pressure of <140 mmHg in both treatment groups will be achieved using an algorithm of dry weight adjustment and anti-hypertensive medication adjustment.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Pirfenidone to Prevent Progression in Chronic Kidney Disease

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Kidney disease is a global health problem, affecting more than 10% of the world's population and more than half of adults over 70 years of age in the United States. Persons with kidney disease are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, heart failure, physical function decline, and mortality. Kidney scarring is a dominant factor in the development of kidney disease. Our group has evaluated several tests to determine the severity of scarring without requiring kidney biopsies, using MRI imaging scans and evaluating markers of scarring that we can measure in the urine. In this study we will use these measures to evaluate pirfenidone as a promising potential new treatment for patients with kidney disease.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Observational Extension Study for Adult Patients Treated in Study R5459-RT-1944 Who Receive A Kidney Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    The primary objective of the study is to assess adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) in kidney transplant recipients previously treated with REGN5459 or REGN5458 in the R5459-RT-1944 study. The secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate each of the following in kidney transplant recipients previously treated with REGN5459 or REGN5458: - Rates and classification of antibody-mediated and T-cell-mediated kidney allograft rejection - Graft survival - Allograft function - Delayed allograft function - Anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alloantibody levels and calculated panel-reactive antibody (cPRA) - Emergence of de novo donor-specific antibodies - Circulating immunoglobulin (Ig) classes (isotypes) - Pharmacokinetics (PK) of REGN5459 or REGN5458

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • APOL1 Long-term Kidney Transplantation Outcomes Network (APOLLO)

    open to eligible people ages 0 years and up

    The APOLLO study is being done in an attempt to improve outcomes after kidney transplantation and to improve the safety of living kidney donation based upon variation in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1). Genes control what is inherited from a family, such as eye color or blood type. Variation in APOL1 can cause kidney disease. African Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, Hispanic Blacks, and Africans are more likely to have the APOL1 gene variants that cause kidney disease. APOLLO will test DNA from kidney donors and recipients of kidney transplants for APOL1 to determine effects on kidney transplant-related outcomes.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Genetic Testing in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Individuals with a diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) often have a family history of the condition although up to 10-15% of cases are sporadic mutations. The investigators recently conducted an analysis of the investigators clinic population to determine percentages of individuals who have undergone kidney imaging and genetic testing and determined total numbers of patients eligible for tolvaptan and those currently active on tolvaptan. The study team found large racial discrepancies in usage of tolvaptan and found that more patients are eligible for tolvaptan than are currently taking the medication. Reasons for this are often due to patient perception about the medication rather than treatment failure. There is a strong medical need to understand reasons for underuse of this critical medication in this population. Among those with genetic testing, the study team found large disparities in ethnic background between individuals offered genetic testing who accept versus decline testing. The study team also found that those who choose to pursue genetic testing are more likely to have no family history of the condition, presumably because the diagnosis is more "surprising" to them and thus desire for verification by genetic testing, if possible, is greater. However, it is known that genetic testing can be an important component of understanding of disease biology in all patients with ADPKD, while also providing important clinical information in some cases as individuals prepare for living donor transplantation or family planning. The investigators seek to understand barriers to use of tolvaptan and genetic testing among individuals in the clinic population and their relatives across a wide range of racial and ethnic backgrounds. The investigators hypothesize that anxiety about genetic conditions in particular is a barrier to accepting testing. The investigators seek to understand the mental health aspects of the diagnosis of ADPKD. They will also evaluate changes in symptoms compared to pre-treatment after initiation of tolvaptan in eligible individuals using qualitative techniques. In so doing, the study team hope to improve care for current patients and also to expand the pool of the clinic population to include newly diagnosed family members ideally at early stages of disease.

    San Francisco, California

  • Pilot to Examine Risk and Feasibility of Remote Management of BP From CKD Through ESRD

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    The transition from chronic kidney disease (CKD) to end-stage renal disease ESRD is a vulnerable and challenging period of time for patients and providers. Suboptimal control of blood pressure is known to be common in patients with the advanced stages of CKD, and may contribute to their elevated risk of progression to ESRD, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. This proposal is a pilot randomized controlled trial designed to test whether intensive blood pressure lowering is feasible and safe in patients with advanced CKD as they transition to ESRD.

    San Francisco, California

  • Belimumab With Rituximab for Primary Membranous Nephropathy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of belimumab and intravenous rituximab co-administration at inducing a complete remission (CR) compared to rituximab alone in participants with primary membranous nephropathy. Background: Primary membranous nephropathy (MN) is among the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome in adults. MN affects individuals of all ages and races. The peak incidence of MN is in the fifth decade of life. Primary MN is recognized to be an autoimmune disease, a disease where the body's own immune system causes damage to kidneys. This damage can cause the loss of too much protein in the urine. Drugs used to treat MN aim to reduce the attack by one's own immune system on the kidneys by blocking inflammation and reducing the immune system's function. These drugs can have serious side effects and often do not cure the disease. There is a need for new treatments for MN that are better at improving the disease while reducing fewer treatment associated side effects. In this study, researchers will evaluate if treatment with a combination of two different drugs, belimumab and rituximab, is effective at blocking the immune attacks on the kidney compared to rituximab alone. Rituximab works by decreasing a type of immune cell, called B cells. B cells are known to have a role in MN. Once these cells are removed, disease may become less active or even inactive. However, after stopping treatment, the body will make new B cells which may cause disease to become active again. Belimumab works by decreasing the new B cells produced by the body and, may even change the type of new B cells subsequently produced. Belimumab is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (also referred to as lupus or SLE). Rituximab is approved by the FDA to treat some types of cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis. Neither rituximab nor belimumab is approved by the FDA to treat MN. Treatment with a combination of belimumab and rituximab has not been studied in individuals with MN, but has been tested in other autoimmune diseases, including lupus nephritis and Sjögren's syndrome.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Long Term Extension Study in Patients With Primary Hyperoxaluria

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The proposed study is designed to provide patients previously enrolled in Phase 1 and 2 studies of DCR-PHXC and their siblings (<18 years old) long-term access to DCR-PHXC, and to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of DCR-PHXC in patients with PH.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Ravulizumab in Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The primary objective of this study to evaluate the efficacy of ravulizumab compared with placebo to reduce proteinuria and slow the rate of eGFR decline in adult participants with IgAN who are at risk of disease progression.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and Membranous nephropathy (MN), generate an enormous individual and societal financial burden, accounting for approximately 12% of prevalent end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases (2005) at an annual cost in the US of more than $3 billion. However, the clinical classification of these diseases is widely believed to be inadequate by the scientific community. Given the poor understanding of MCD/FSGS and MN biology, it is not surprising that the available therapies are imperfect. The therapies lack a clear biological basis, and as many families have experienced, they are often not beneficial, and in fact may be significantly toxic. Given these observations, it is essential that research be conducted that address these serious obstacles to effectively caring for patients. In response to a request for applications by the National Institutes of Health, Office of Rare Diseases (NIH, ORD) for the creation of Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortia, a number of affiliated universities joined together with The NephCure Foundation the NIDDK, the ORDR, and the University of Michigan in collaboration towards the establishment of a Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) Rare Diseases Clinical Research Consortium. Through this consortium the investigators hope to understand the fundamental biology of these rare diseases and aim to bank long-term observational data and corresponding biological specimens for researchers to access and further enrich.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Kidney Disease research studies include .

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