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Depression clinical trials at UCSF

22 in progress, 15 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Neuroimaging Study of Open-label Placebo in Depressed Adolescents

    open to eligible people ages 13-18

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the current leading cause of disability worldwide and adolescence is an especially vulnerable period for the onset of depression. Non-pharmacologic approaches are particularly attractive as treatment of adolescent depression due to the elevated risks of side effects related to the use of psychotropic drugs during development. A recent meta-analysis detected a positive and significant effect of non-deceptive placebos (open-label placebo, OLP) for a series of clinical conditions, including adult depression. To the investigators' knowledge, no studies of OLP have been conducted in depressed adolescents to date, although placebo response rates in adolescent depression are especially high, accounting for over 80% of the actual response to antidepressant treatment. The study's main objective is to estimate the effectiveness and understand the mechanism of OLP in depressed adolescents. The central hypothesis is that the mechanism by which OLP exerts its action in adolescent depression is by forming a positive expectation, which activates endogenous mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-mediated neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the pathophysiology of MDD, namely, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) - striato - amygdalo - thalamic network. The hypothesis has been formulated on the basis of published research and preliminary data. The investigators will test the hypothesis by performing structural and functional neuroimaging in 60 untreated 13-18 year-old adolescents with mild to moderate depression. The proposed research is significant, because it is expected to elucidate the mechanism of action of OLP and advance the understanding of the neural underpinnings of positive expectations in adolescent depression.

    San Francisco, California

  • A Study of Psilocybin for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

    open to eligible people ages 21-65

    Eighty participants, ages 21 to 65, who meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) will be stratified by study site and randomized with a 1-to-1 allocation under double-blind conditions to receive a single 25 mg oral dose of psilocybin or a single 100 mg oral dose of niacin. Niacin will serve as an active placebo. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential efficacy of a single 25 mg oral dose of psilocybin for MDD compared to the active placebo in otherwise medically-healthy participants, assessed as the difference between groups in changes in depressive symptoms from Baseline to Day 8 post-dose.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • An Adaptive Intervention for Depression Among Latinos Living With HIV.

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will use a pilot sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) design to build an adaptive treatment strategy (ATS) for depression and engagement in HIV among Latinos living with HIV. The ATS is the sequencing of treatments, which are a behavioral activation therapy (BAT), a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and mobile health (mHealth) tool. The outcomes are to assess the feasibility of the SMART and ATS in the HIV care site and acceptability of the SMART and ATS to patients and clinic staff.

    San Francisco, California

  • Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up for Depression

    open to eligible females ages 18-50

    The overarching goal is to pilot the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) intervention for mothers with heightened depressive symptom and their children with heightened internalizing symptoms.

    San Francisco, California

  • Cellular Aging and Neurobiology of Depression Study

    open to eligible people ages 21-60

    We are conducting an eight week longitudinal study to learn if blood levels of certain naturally occurring compounds and genetic markers differ between patients with depression and healthy adults who are not depressed, and if any such differences relate to memory performance, mood, and neurobiology. We will do this by comparing the unmedicated depressed patients with matched healthy controls at baseline and then following the depressed patients over the course of eight weeks of standardized antidepressant treatment to gauge which baseline abnormalities normalize over the course of treatment.

    San Francisco, California

  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Major Depression

    open to eligible people ages 22-70

    Neurons are specialized types of cells that are responsible for carrying out the functions of the brain. Neurons communicate with electrical signals. In diseases such as major depression this electrical communication can go awry. One way to change brain function is using electrical stimulation to help alter the communication between groups of neurons in the brain. The purpose of this study is to test a personalized approach to brain stimulation as an intervention for depression. The study researchers will use a surgically implanted device to measure each individual's brain activity related to his/her depression. The researchers will then use small electrical impulses to alter that brain activity and measure whether these changes help reduce depression symptoms. This study is intended for patients with major depression whose symptoms have not been adequately treated with currently available therapies. The device used in this study is called the NeuroPace Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS) System. It is currently FDA approved to treat patients with epilepsy. The study will test whether personalized responsive neurostimulation can safely and effectively treat depression.

    San Francisco, California

  • Cognitive Training Delivered Remotely to Individuals With Psychosis (ROAM)

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    Primary study: This study is a single-site, double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial to compare an evidence-based structured program of 30-35 hours of on-line cognitive and social cognitive training exercises performed over 16 weeks (~2 hours per week), delivered with an innovative digital app which provides users with a motivation coach to set personalized goals and with secure social networking for peer support, "PRIME" ; vs. 2) A control condition of computer games, encouraged at ~2 hours per week over 16 weeks, delivered with "PRIME". Unblinded Cognitive Training Sub-Study: Participants who were randomized to the computer games arm of the trial may be offered access to the active cognitive training at the end of their 6 month follow up appointments, if they still meet inclusion criteria. PRIME Super Users Sub-Study: Participants who have provided all follow up data to the initial study, including those who are currently enrolled in the Unblinded Cognitive Training sub-study, may be offered continued participation in the PRIME community as super-users.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Computerized Substance Use and Depression Screening and Behavioral Treatment in HIV Primary Care

    open to all eligible people

    Substance use disorders (SUDs), depression and anxiety in HIV-infected patients result in poor HIV outcomes, yet are often unrecognized and untreated. To address these problems, this study examines the implementation and effectiveness of a clinical intervention consisting of self-administered tablet-based SUD and depression screening at routine HIV primary care clinic visits, followed by evidence-based treatments for SUD, anxiety and depression delivered by a behavioral health specialist. If successful, this study has potential to reduce SUD-, anxiety- and depression-related problems and reduce HIV treatment disparities for patients with these comorbidities.

    Oakland, California

  • Diabetes and Depression Text Messaging Intervention

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    The main aim of the "Diabetes and Mental Health Adaptive Notification Tracking and Evaluation" trial (DIAMANTE) is to test a smartphone intervention that generates adaptive messaging, learning from daily patient data to personalize the timing and type of text-messages. We will compare the adaptive content to 1. a static messaging intervention with health management and educational messages and 2. a control condition that receives a weekly mood message. The primary outcomes for this aim will be improvements in physical activity at 6-month follow-up defined by daily step counts.

    San Francisco, California

  • Engaging Mothers & Babies; Reimagining Antenatal Care for Everyone (EMBRACE) Study

    open to eligible females

    This is a randomized comparative effectiveness study of two forms of enhanced prenatal care among 2,600 Medi-Cal eligible pregnant women in Fresno, California. The goal is to see whether group prenatal care with wrap around services versus individual prenatal care supplemented by services covered by the California Department of Public Health Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP) results in lower rates of preterm birth, less depression and anxiety, and more respectful and greater satisfaction with prenatal care.

    Fresno, California

  • FACE-PC: Family-Centered Care for Older Adults With Depression and Chronic Medical Conditions in Primary Care

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    Comorbid depression and multiple medical conditions in older adults are a serious public health problem. As an important facilitator of health-related activities, families are already involved in various aspects of self-management of chronic disease in older adults. Despite the benefits they provide, informal caregiving activities currently are organized outside the medical system, which potentially creates redundant or misaligned efforts.The purpose of the mentored research is to examine the feasibility and acceptability of the FACE-PC, a theory-driven, multi- component, technology-assisted interdisciplinary team-based care model that systematically involves family in chronic disease management. It aims to optimize the patient and family's collective ability to self-manage chronic disease.

    San Francisco, California

  • Multimodal MRI Characteristics of Psychotherapy Response in Late Life Depression

    open to eligible people ages 65 years and up

    The specific focus of this study is to gather data regarding the effects of a psychological therapy known as Problem Solving Therapy (PST) on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cortical gray matter (GM) atrophy, subcortical white matter (WM) lesion burden, and measures of cognitive function in subjects with Late Life Major Depressive Disorder (LLD). This research goal will be achieved by recruiting 110 individuals over the age of 65 with LLD. The primary outcomes will be change in CBF, change in GM atrophy, change in WM lesion, change in cognitive function, and change in depression severity from baseline to the end of 12 weeks of PST.

    San Francisco, California

  • Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for Assessment of Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Develop a NIRSIT testing protocol that can be administered in the diagnostic setting and reliably distinguishes the symptoms and severity of depression, with the help of repeated measure (up to five visits per subject) comparison of patients being treated for Major Depressive Disorder with control, non-depressed subjects.

    San Francisco, California

  • Rural Dementia Caregiver Project

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    These caregivers are a vulnerable group due to their physical isolation and well-documented rural disparities in health care access and quality. Many rural dementia caregivers experience serious health consequences due to caregiving responsibilities that can limit their ability to maintain their caregiving role. Thus, there is a pressing need for effective, scalable, and accessible programs to support rural dementia caregivers. Online programs offer a convenient and readily translatable option for program delivery because they can be accessed by caregivers in the home and at the convenience of the user. Building Better Caregivers is an online 6-week, interactive, small-group self-management, social support, and skills-building workshop developed for caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia. The investigators will conduct a hybrid effectiveness-implementation randomized controlled trial that will enroll and randomize 640 rural dementia caregivers into two groups: 320 in the intervention (workshop) group and 320 in the attention control group. Caregivers will be recruited throughout the United States. Primary outcomes will be caregiver stress and depression symptoms. The investigators hypothesize that stress scores and depression symptoms will be significantly improved at 12 months in the intervention group versus control group. The investigators will also identify key strengths (facilitators) and weaknesses (barriers) of workshop implementation. The investigators will use the RE-AIM implementation framework and a mixed methods approach to identify implementation characteristics pertinent to both caregivers and rural community organizations. If the Building Better Caregivers workshop is proven to be effective, this research has the potential to open new research horizons, particularly on how to reach and effectively support isolated dementia caregivers in rural areas with an intervention that is scalable, even in low-resourced settings. If the workshop can achieve its goals with rural dementia caregivers, some of those most isolated, it would also be expected to be scalable in other low-resourced settings (e.g., in urban or suburban environments).

    San Francisco, California

  • The Effect of Problem Solving Therapy and Antidepressant Therapy on Cerebral Perfusion and Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) in Depressed Elders

    open to eligible people ages 65 years and up

    The focus of this study is to gather preliminary data regarding the effects of a psychological therapy-Problem Solving Therapy-and an antidepressant medication-sertraline-on 1) cerebral perfusion (CP), 2) brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and 3) measures of cognitive function in subjects with late life major depression (LLMD). This research goal will be achieved by recruiting 38 individuals over the age of 65 with LLMD. The primary outcomes will be change in CP, change in BDNF, and change in cognitive measures from baseline to the end of 12 weeks of either therapy. We will also examine predictors of treatment outcome including severity of executive dysfunction, baseline BDNF concentrations, and baseline CP measures. The baseline neuropsychological testing, brain imaging, and depression assessment will be obtained in a companion study (PI S. Mackin; CHR #H42689-32681-01) that is IRB approved and is already in progress. In the current study a baseline serum BDNF level will be added to Dr. Mackin's protocol. Patients will then receive either 12 weeks of Problem Solving Therapy or antidepressant treatment with sertraline. Both treatments are evidence based and commonly administered in our clinic. Outcome variables will be measures of depression severity, the BDNF serum concentration, cerebral perfusion using a MRI arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique and cognitive changes in memory and executive dysfunction. This is a preliminary or pilot study. The primary objectives are to determine if the methods appear feasible and to determine if change in BDNF or CP occur after treatment and secondarily to determine if there are changes in cognitive functioning. The study is not powered to show differences between treatments. The hypotheses are 1) PST will result in increased perfusion in frontal regions of the brain but that frontal perfusion will not change with sertraline; 2)sertraline will result in an increase in BDNF but PST will not. Change in cognitive measures of memory, learning, and executive dysfunction will be examined on an exploratory basis.

    San Francisco, California

  • Azithromycin for Meibomian Gland Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aims to elucidate the effectiveness of oral azithromycin in treating symptomatic dry eye syndrome secondary to Meibomian gland dysfunction.

    San Francisco, California

  • Characterizing Cognitive Decline in Late Life Depression: The ADNI Depression Project

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this research study is to characterize the mechanisms contributing to cognitive impairment and accelerated cognitive decline in Late Life Depression (LLD). This is a non-randomized, observational, non-treatment study. One hundred and twenty (120) subjects who meet criteria for Major Depression or LLD will be enrolled for a period of 30 months. Data from an additional 300 non-depressed subjects will be used from ADNI studies for comparison. Depression history, symptom severity and health information will be collected at the initial psychiatric visit to determine eligibility. A 3 Tesla (3T) Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and florbetapir (18F-AV-45) amyloid imaging will be conducted at the ADNI clinic site visits. Collection of plasma and serum for biomarkers, clinical assessments and cognitive assessments will be conducted at two time points. Blood samples will also be collected for genetic analysis.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Incidence OIRD Medical and Trauma Patients

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The primary objective of this prospective, blinded observational study is to correlate assessment of sedation and respiratory status with capnography and pulse oximetry monitoring in hospitalized adult medical and trauma patients receiving patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or nurse administered intravenous opioids for acute pain. Nursing assessment of respiratory status and sedation level will be correlated with capnography and pulse oximetry values as technology-supported monitoring to identify respiratory depression and opioid-induced sedation. The secondary objective is to identify capnography and pulse oximetry values that correlate with respiratory decompensation and opioid-induced sedation in medical and trauma patients on the general care floor.

    Fresno, California

  • MBCT for People With Parkinson's Disease and Caregivers

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aims to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in reducing anxiety and/or depressive symptoms in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and caregivers of people with PD.

    San Francisco, California

  • PRIME Care (PRecision Medicine In MEntal Health Care)

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The focus of this application is on the impact of providing depressed Veterans and their providers with the results of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing for psychotropic medications. The project focuses on whether and how patients and providers use genetic test results given to them at the time an antidepressant is to be initiated to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and whether use of the test results improves patient outcomes. MDD is one of the most common conditions associated with military service and combat exposure, increases suicide risk, and worsens the course of common medical conditions, making it a leading cause of functional impairment and mortality. Validation of a PGx test to personalize the treatment of MDD represents an important opportunity to improve the healthcare of Veterans.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • SMART-DAPPER: Leveraging the Depression And Primary-care Partnership for Effectiveness-implementation Research Project

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Despite carrying the vast majority of the global mental disorder burden, 75% of adults with mental disorders in Low and Middle Income Countries have no access to services. This study will test strategies for integrating first and second line evidence-based depression and trauma-related disorder treatments with primary care services at a large public sector hospital and conduct robust cost and cost-benefit analyses of each treatment to produce a "menu" of cost-benefit options for personalized, integrated mental health care with corresponding effectiveness and implementation values.

  • Telepsychology in Spinal Cord Injury

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study will determine the effectiveness of tele-psychology in treating persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) with depressed mood in the early period post-rehabilitation discharge. Depression among individuals with SCI is the most common psychological condition following an injury; 22% of civilians with SCI and 28% of veterans with SCI experience depression after injury, which is higher than the able-bodied population (Williams 2015; Ullrich 2014). Individuals with SCI face many barriers in receiving psychotherapy, such as lack of accessible transportation, unfamiliarity with community resources, or stigma associated with seeking treatment for depression, which this project aims to address. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), which helps people develop different ways of thinking and behaving to reduce their psychological distress, will be provided via iPad FaceTime by a psychologist with expertise in working with persons with SCI. The objectives of the proposed project are to reduce depressive symptoms, decrease associated symptoms of anxiety, and to improve satisfaction with life with CBT provided via tele-psychology. The secondary objective is to show intermediate efficacy of tele-psychology in persons with SCI with depressed mood.

    San Jose, California

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