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Immunodeficiency clinical trials at UCSF

10 in progress, 5 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Autologous Gene Therapy for Artemis-Deficient SCID

    open to eligible people ages 2 months and up

    This study aims to determine if a new method can be used to treat Artemis-deficient Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (ART-SCID), a severe form of primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the DCLRE1C gene. This method involves transferring a normal copy of the DCLRE1C gene into stem cells of an affected patient. Participants will receive an infusion of stem cells transduced with a self-inactivating lentiviral vector that contains a normal copy of the DCLRE1C gene. Prior to the infusion they will receive sub-ablative, dose-targeted busulfan conditioning. The study will investigate if the procedure is safe, whether it can be done according to the methods described in the protocol, and whether the procedure will provide a normal immune system for the patient. A total of 15 patients will be enrolled at the University of California San Francisco in this single-site trial, and will be followed for 15 years post-infusion. It is hoped that this type of gene transfer may offer improved outcomes for ART-SCID patients who lack a brother or sister who can be used as a donor for stem cell transplantation or who have failed to develop a functioning immune system after a previous stem cell transplant.

    San Francisco, California

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called "anti-HIV genes" are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Gene Transfer for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in Newly Diagnosed Infants

    open to eligible males ages up to 24 months

    SCID-X1 is a genetic disorder of blood cells caused by DNA changes in a gene that is required for the normal development of the human immune system. The purpose of this study is to determine if a new method, called lentiviral gene transfer, can be used to treat SCID-X1. This method involves transferring a normal copy of the common gamma chain gene into the participant's bone marrow stem cells. The investigators want to determine if the procedure is safe, whether it can be done according to the methods they have developed, and whether the procedure will provide a normal immune system for the patient. It is hoped that this type of gene transfer may offer a new way to treat children with SCID-X1 that do not have a brother or sister who can be used as a donor for stem cell transplantation.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Natural History Study of SCID Disorders

    open to all eligible people

    This study is a prospective evaluation of children with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) who are treated under a variety of protocols used by participating institutions. In order to determine the patient, recipient and transplant-related variables that are most important in determining outcome, study investigators will uniformly collect pre-, post- and peri-transplant (or other treatment) information on all children enrolled into this study. Children will be divided into three strata: - Stratum A: Typical SCID with virtual absence of autologous T cells and poor T cell function - Stratum B: Atypical SCID (leaky SCID, Omenn syndrome and reticular dysgenesis with limited T cell diversity or number and reduced function), and - Stratum C: ADA deficient SCID and XSCID patients receiving alternative therapy including PEG-ADA ERT or gene therapy. Each Group/Cohort Stratum will be analyzed separately.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

  • Study of Thiotepa and TEPA Drug Exposure in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    open to eligible people ages up to 17 years

    Thiotepa is a chemotherapy drug used extensively in bone marrow transplantation. Thiotepa is a prodrug that undergoes metabolic conversion in the liver by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 to its primary active metabolite, TEPA. The goal of this study is to determine what causes some children to have different drug concentrations of thiotepa and TEPA in their bodies and if drug levels are related to whether or not a child experiences severe side-effects during their bone marrow transplant. The hypothesis is that certain clinical and genetic factors cause changes in thiotepa and TEPA drug levels in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients and that high levels may cause severe side-effects.

    San Francisco, California

  • Expanded Access Protocol (EAP) Using the CliniMACS® Device for Pediatric Haplocompatible Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Sorry, not accepting new patients

    This protocol provides expanded access to bone marrow transplants for children who lack a histocompatible (tissue matched) stem cell or bone marrow donor when an alternative donor (unrelated donor or half-matched related donor) is available to donate. In this procedure, some of the blood forming cells (the stem cells) are collected from the blood of a partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched (haploidentical) donor and are transplanted into the patient (the recipient) after administration of a "conditioning regimen". A conditioning regimen consists of chemotherapy and sometimes radiation to the entire body (total body irradiation, or TBI), which is meant to destroy the cancer cells and suppress the recipient's immune system to allow the transplanted cells to take (grow). A major problem after a transplant from an alternative donor is increased risk of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GVHD), which occurs when donor T cells (white blood cells that are involved with the body's immune response) attack other tissues or organs like the skin, liver and intestines of the transplant recipient. In this study, stem cells that are obtained from a partially-matched donor will be highly purified using the investigational CliniMACS® stem cell selection device in an effort to achieve specific T cell target values. The primary aim of the study is to help improve overall survival with haploidentical stem cell transplant in a high risk patient population by limiting the complication of GVHD.

    San Francisco, California

  • Study of Clofarabine and Fludarabine Drug Exposure in Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation (HCT)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Fludarabine and clofarabine are chemotherapy drugs used extensively in bone marrow transplantation. The goal of this study is to determine what causes some children to have different drug concentrations of clofarabine and fludarabine in their bodies and if drug levels are related to whether or not a child experiences severe side-effects during their bone marrow transplant. The hypothesis is that clinical and individual factors cause changes in clofarabine and fludarabine drug levels in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients and that high levels may cause severe side-effects.

    San Francisco, California

  • Study of Fludarabine Drug Exposure in Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Fludarabine is a chemotherapy drug used extensively in bone marrow transplantation. The goal of this study is to determine what causes some children to have different drug concentrations of fludarabine in their bodies and if drug levels are related to whether or not a child experiences severe side-effects during their bone marrow transplant. The hypothesis is that clinical and genetic factors cause changes in fludarabine drug levels in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients and that high levels may cause severe side-effects.

    San Francisco, California

  • Study of Melphalan Drug Exposure in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Melphalan is a chemotherapy drug used extensively in bone marrow transplantation. The goal of this study is to determine what causes some children to have different drug concentrations of melphalan in their bodies and if drug levels are related to whether or not a child experiences severe side-effects during their bone marrow transplant. The hypothesis is that certain clinical and individual factors cause changes in melphalan drug levels in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients and that high levels may cause severe side-effects.

    San Francisco, California

  • Switch to Doravirine/Islatravir (DOR/ISL) in Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) Participants Treated With Bictegravir/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide (BIC/FTC/TAF) (MK-8591A-018)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of a switch to MK-8591A (a fixed dose combination of doravirine and islatravir) in human immunodeficiency virus -1 (HIV-1)-infected participants virologically suppressed on a regimen of bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (BIC/FTC/TAF). The primary hypothesis is that a switch to MK-8591A will be non-inferior to continued treatment with BIC/FTC/TAF as assessed by the proportion of participants with HIV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) ≥50 copies/mL at Week 48.

    San Francisco, California and other locations

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